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Comparing two Newspaper Articles

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Introduction

Comparing two Newspaper Articles The 'Mirror' report uses various techniques that are typical of tabloid newspapers for example tabloidese. There is no evidence of sophisticated vocabulary and the short sentences encourage a rapid reading pace. The language is exciting, and the use of the simile 'ripped apart like a cardboard box', helps the reader visualise the fragility of the cable car, and indicates the violence of the nature of the accident. The use of onomatopoeia also supports the reader's vision of the scene, for example, 'ripped' 'screamed' 'crashing' 'torn'. All of these onomatopoeic words are violent words, that when contrasted with the beauty and idyllic setting of the snow covered mountains, give the feeling that the serenity had been brutally spoiled. The mirror report dramatically describes the incident using figurative language. The use of figures in the text adds a certain formality to the article, which helps maintain the seriousness of the issue as tabloids are known for their highly compressed language, heavy use of puns, and hyperbole. The use of emotive language provoke feelings of sympathy from the reader for example, 'The victims including a woman and a young child', 'bodies lying beneath sheets of metal, most of them torn apart'. ...read more.

Middle

The use of colloquialism is restricted to the eyewitness accounts and intricate vocabulary is maintained throughout the whole article. The vocabulary is somewhat proverbial and lacks the element of aggression that makes the 'Mirror' report so interesting. There is no sense of emotion within the body of the article, it's almost too official. 'Twenty people fell three hundred feet to their deaths,' seems to be the most gripping line in the entire article. One witness commented that, 'it seemed to have technical trouble.' This quote does not reflect the emotions of a hysterical witness and there is a parallel in that the word 'technical' generalises the whole report. We can see that 'The Times' uses typical broadsheet language because of the use of sophisticated vocabulary, formal tone and lengthy sentences. It also has a very 'matter of fact' attitude when reporting the incident. Being an American publication 'Newsweek' uses language in an attempt to try and downplay the impact of the incident, suggesting the complaints lodged against them was some form of anti- Americanism. There is some use of figures however the articles actual priority does not seem to be the incident, but the defence of the Americans. ...read more.

Conclusion

The language used in 'Newsweek' is quite formal, but like the mirror, there is no evidence of the sophisticated vocabulary that often supports formality. The reporter's insular way of thinking is elucidated further, when an account from an American is included in the article. The report does not contain enough information about the accident to be called informative and a patronising tone, makes the articles bias very obvious. The language used is neither figurative nor emotive but like 'The Times' is very matter of fact. Another way in which the article tries to downplay the impact of the incident is the specific use of vocabulary. 'Fighter jet clipped two cables.' The use of the word clipped, implicates that in some way, the cables were not strong enough, the plane should not have been able to 'clip' the cable of cars that were carrying 20 people, so again there is this idea that the Americans weren't to blame. 'Yellow gondola full of skiers tumbling to the ground,' the word tumbling completely cushions the violence of the accident and the fact that there are no images of the scene means that it is unlikely an American reader will have a true realisation of the horror of the incident. ...read more.

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