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'Documentaries have to be constructed in just the same way as fictional programs'. How far do you agree with this statement?

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Introduction

'Documentaries have to be constructed in just the same way as fictional programs'. How far do you agree with this statement? At first glance you would think that a fictional program and a documentary couldn't be more dissimilar from each other, but they do have their similarities. Naturally sometimes these two types of program are different in the way they do things due to the message they are trying to get across or the mood they are trying to set but methods they use to achieve these things are much the same. They both share the same camera techniques to achieve the same effects when filming; using close up shots to show emotion, far out shot to show a landscape and also the medium distance to give a balance of the two. ...read more.

Middle

It emphasizes the emotions and atmosphere in the text. It can change the audience's perception of the scene whether you put in fast paced or slow music, rock or orchestral all these different genres of music can change the way the audience feels towards a certain character, location or situation. Voiceover is another tool that can be used in any media text, but is probably used mostly in documentaries. Voiceover narration occurs when a voice is heard on the soundtrack without a matching source in the image but sometimes this voiceover is shown with no source but then the origin is shown on the screen after a while. In other words we hear the voice speak but we cannot see the speaker utter the words. ...read more.

Conclusion

This may seem harmless at first but what the writers are really trying to say, in this portrayal of the leaders, is this was often how the high-ranking figures in world war one were perceived. Documentaries use facts and figures, interviews with people who have knowledge on the subject. Sitcoms display their messages through subversive meanings through the way the characters act or their reactions to certain situations. In conclusion, I do agree with the statement in the title to the extent that the similarities out numbered the differences. Documentaries and fictional programs both used the same camera effects, are shown at the similar times. They are both trying to give or change the audience's opinion on the subject in question. They do this by using either subversive meanings in the characters or situations or by getting knowledgeable people to give their opinion on the subject. ...read more.

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