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Dry September Faulkner describes the setting and characters to show the conflict and the race relations that go

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Introduction

Dry September Faulkner describes the setting and characters to show the conflict and the race relations that go on in the story. There are a lot of conflicts between people not just because of the race relationship but as well as internal conflicts that are not as obvious. There are three major characters (out of 6), Hawkshaw, Minnie, and McLendon, who are the main characters and the book is divided into 5 sections. The first section is an argument over the raping of Minnie at the barbershop, the argument is basically between the world and Hawkshaw, the second section is a flashback to Minnie's life, the third section is the barbershop again, this time we see a gang being formed, the fourth section is Minnie's life now, and the fifth section gives us a little information about McLendon's background. The overwhelming setting is a hot, dry September day, "sixty-two rainless days" (para. 1). The characters use the setting as an excuse to be irritable, defensive, after all the eaht does make people do things like that. In Part V, the part about McLendon's life at home it has his wife stating, "Don't John...I couldn't sleep...the heat; something" (para. ...read more.

Middle

If one reads the book the most obvious conflict between the characters is the actual matter of race relations, the actual "did Minnie get raped or not". Most of the people in the barbershop believe that because Will Mayes is a black person, that he automatically did it, putting the race relations as white supremacy, especially a white woman. A young man, states "wont you take a white women's word before a nigger's?" (para. 6), implying that the white woman had the upper-hand, it didn't matter if they were at fault or not. The most important conflict and most clear is the conflict between McLendon and Hawkshaw. They are not only different personalities, but have different views on things. Hawkshaw is more friendly, rational and able to keep his composure, where as McLendon is a feisty, stubborn, short-tempered, sadistic man. We find out in Section IV that he beats his wife, showing the sadistic part of him. He "released her and half struck, half flung her across the chair" (para. 100) Hawkshaw is rational because he does not put anyone down or tell them they are wrong. ...read more.

Conclusion

We don't know if she is laughing because she is aware now that the movie is infact her life and she has a realization of what her life is now or because she just all of the sudden has a mental breakdown. We know Minnie is sexually frustrated because her house is plain and white; she's a plain looking girl, "a comfortable looking girl", nothing special. "No man ever called on her steadily" (para. 50), so no man wanted her or even looked at her when she walked by, "in the doors of which the sitting and lounging men didn't even follow with their eyes anymore" (para. 52), but then after she gets raped we find she gets the sexual attraction she wants. "Then the drug store, where even the young men lounging in the doorway tipped their hats and followed with their eyes the notions of her hips and legs when she passed. (para. 89). In conclusion, there are a lot of things that add to the story, including things in the story such as descriptions and rhetorical features. In "Dry September" Faulkner uses the setting in particular the weather and the character development and relations to add and define the underlining theme of Racial Relations. ...read more.

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