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Entertain? Inform? Change our thinking? Confirm what we already know? What is television drama designed to do and how does it do it?

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Introduction

Entertain? Inform? Change our thinking? Confirm what we already know? What is television drama designed to do and how does it do it? In the early days of television, serious dramas sitcoms, and other mainstream TV genre's emerged as shows which affects its audience by re-enforcing socially accepted values and attitudes, they did this, in most cases, by taking advantage of the stereotypes of "lesser" social groups. Producers of T.V dramas soon found that by reinforcing socially acceptable values and attitudes they attracted higher ratings, and as a result, not only did they portray these values, they emphasized their importance to society in the changing world. Even in this modern day we are still seeing conservative values being reflected in some of the modern television dramas. The Simpsons is a highly stereotypical representation of American life, it uses satire and commonly held stereotypes to entertain its intended audience. ...read more.

Middle

Satire is a powerful way in which to influence and entertain viewers of T.V drama. It can present powerful and sometimes shocking views, but, because of the humorous nature of this convention, it is ok. In the Simpsons we see in the opening section that the whole family rushes in from school, work and errands to watch T.V. We laugh at this but the irony is that we are watching the Simpsons on our televisions, so it is actually making fun of us. Also, during the "graveyard scene" where Monty and Abe are talking about the Hellfish bonanza burns says to Abe "cant you go five seconds without humiliating yourself" and then Abe's pants fall down. This scene insults old peaple as a whole and because it is a satirical perception, it is accepted by its audience. Thus the Simpsons use satire as a way to entertain and inform us. ...read more.

Conclusion

a cherished ideal, which we should all strive to achieve, by using TV drama ( being a very affective way to reach an audience) it allows these values to continue to be a major factor in today's society. Thus TV dramas are important due to the conservative values portrayed within them. The television drama "The Simpsons" is made for more than just the purpose of entertainment. It is designed to present reality as it is and not as we would like it to be. "The Simpsons" does this by using satire, stereotyping "The Simpsons" tackles controversial issues with a comic approach, making it easier for the audience to be aware of these issues without watching a serious drama or documentary. This show provide legitimate social commentary about issues of importance to society. Television dramas are slowly turning to reality because it is something that we all belong to and relate to. ...read more.

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