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Explore how gender, ethnicity, age, nation, place, events or issues are represented in Avatar Film

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Explore how gender, ethnicity, age, nation, place, events or issues are represented in Avatar Film The 2009 film 'Avatar', directed by James Cameron, has gained widespread success, earning the accolade of highest grossing film of all time, up from Cameron's last blockbuster 'Titanic'. The film has also provoked intense discussion of a wide variety of political, cultural, religious and social themes. Science Fiction films often display the unfamiliar in context of the familiar. Avatar is no exception. However, despite the alien nature of the scenes and the science fictional setting, the imagery always relates back to mankind and how mankind relates to their surrounds. Avatar uses features common to the science fiction genre; these include spacecrafts, space stations, futuristic gadgets and alien worlds and/or creatures. More delicate visual hints appear with transformations of the human form, for instance alterations in behaviour, appearance, size etc. ...read more.


his audience aware of the problems, and as a means to bring the issues to our minds yet leaving it to us to judge their severity by contrasting them to the disastrous developments of his fictional tale. It can be debated whether Avatar and Cameron's attitude towards the human hostility towards and the indigenous Na'vi is a message of support for the natives today, or alternatively a retelling of the racist myth of the righteous savage. The visual resemblance between the demolition of the World Trade Centre and the film's falling of Home Tree can be reasoned to compare the Na'vi with western civilisation and the military as our terrorist enemies. Also, one can regard the film's handling of environmental issues as supportive of alternative measures to real life's problems and unjust actions damaging our environment. ...read more.


Again Cameron leaves it to his audience to draw the conclusion of the conflicts evolving the story. However, from a slightly more ominous angle it can be argued that the racist undertone in the film conducted by the military towards the Na'vi strengthens the idea of a 'White Messiah', where the white victor helps the weak primitive indigenous, who are consequently reduced to overhauling their aspirations and verifying their hero, or perhaps that the non-whites require a 'White Messiah' to lead their crusade. This skewed vision is underpinned by the choice to let all humanoid characters be played by white actors, whereas the Na'vi characters are played by African / Native American actors. Avatar is rated PG-13, based on its use of language and violence. However, the absence of blood and gore demonstrates maturity in how the story is conveyed. The film maintains its focus on the intellectual story throughout, allowing its audience to relate to current events and issues highlighted by the thematic question posed. ...read more.

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