• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Fighting Talk - Compare and contrast the three newspaper articles, explaining carefully what you like and dislike about them.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Fighting Talk Compare and contrast the three newspaper articles, explaining carefully what you like and dislike about them. by John East There is a large range of daily newspapers available across the country, aimed at a variety of different audiences. Roughly, these papers can be divided into two general categories - broadsheets and tabloids. Broadsheet describes the large pages of newspapers such as 'The Times' or 'Independent'. On the other-hand, the tabloid is the 'small, condensed, sensational newspaper', such as 'The Sun'. The newspapers, and the broadsheets in particular, can also be divided into different political camps. For example, 'The Daily Telegraph' is largely conservative, and has been nicknamed as 'The Daily Tory-graph'. Broadsheets are considered to be the more reliable of the two, presenting the facts as they are and the information unbiased. The tabloids, however, give brief, opinionated news stories that are printed alongside celebrity gossip. As a result, the tabloids have a lower reading age than the broadsheets. The three newspapers from which these articles are taken are 'The Star, 'The Guardian' and 'The Daily Mail'. 'The Guardian' is a liberal broadsheet, aimed at younger, executive people. 'The Star' and 'The Daily Mail' are both tabloids; however, 'The Daily Mail' has tendencies towards the spheres of the broadsheets, with more complex articles and stories, and has a slightly rightwing political stand. ...read more.

Middle

The opening paragraph, indeed, is a metaphor (relating to the headline BRUNO LEFT IN A WASTELAND), and the opening line is a simile 'Frank Bruno was like an intrepid explorer trekking the icy waste'. The reporter continues in this vein, describing losing the fight as slipping 'into a crevasse'. The media compares him to an 'intrepid explorer' because an explorer pursues victory for the sake of glory for his country; in a similar way Bruno's bid for the title 'raised the hopes of thousands'. In a different way, 'The Star' also compares Bruno to something else. Although the evidence is unreliable, the writer of BRAVE BRUNO FALLS maintains that the theme from The Greatest Story Ever Told was being played in Bruno's dressing room after his defeat. This would imply to a reader of 'The Star' that Bruno was as great as Muhammad Ali, but also that all great heroes will peak, and then fall from grace at the end of their life. It seems, to Bruno, that this is the end of his life as a boxer. All three of these articles adopt a similar attitude to Bruno - they are proud of him, and do not think of him as a failure. 'The Star' hero-worships the boxer, indeed, it seems that the whole article is devoted to appraisal for the loser. ...read more.

Conclusion

'The Guardian' reveals that there were no press present in Bruno's dressing room, but the writer for 'The Star' makes out that he was present, comforting Frank Bruno, whilst listening to melancholy music and offering advice. As a piece of sports commentary, BRUNO LEFT IN A WASTELAND is very well structured, providing perfectly the right balance of straight facts and description of the men and their conflict. Beginning with a metaphoric simile also sets the article apart from the others, which are more straightforward. It also includes a rather more reliable quote from Witherspoon, which suggests that this reporter had good access backstage. FANS HAIL BRUNO AS TITLE BID FAILS, the third and final article, is a combined mixture of the previous two. It does not contain all the traits of the tabloid, but neither is it highbrow enough to be a broadsheet article. The reporter is clearly a very knowledgeable person when it comes to boxing, but it does mean that the writing becomes a little stilted and dull to read. The description of the fight, though detailed, does have the feeling of reading a shopping list. Collectively, these articles provide good contrast with one another, and an interesting insight into the different styles of newspapers and articles. Nevertheless, they were not the most thrilling read of all time. - John East, Sunday February 22, 2004 John East Page 1 5/7/2007 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Newspapers & Magazines section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Newspapers & Magazines essays

  1. Comparing two newspaper articles, one from a tabloid and one from a broadsheet will ...

    Hate is displayed by showing the kidnapper as an animal when it uses the phrase 'catch the beast'. It also shows the kidnapper as a violent person by saying that he 'snatched' Sarah Payne. To make the first sentence affective, 'The Sun' has rhymed snatch and catch in one sentence.

  2. Compare and Contrast the Two Articles on Bullying which you recently studied.

    has one sub-heading, 'Hounded', which is written in bold and in a different font to make it stand out and separate the quotations.

  1. Compare and contrast the three newspaper articles, explaining carefully what you like and dislike ...

    The Guardian also ends on a high note. This is the person that has just beaten Bruno saying that he could come back. This is a good point for all fans of frank Bruno. The Daily Mail finishes by giving details about the end of the fight. It tells us how Frank Bruno's manager, Terry Lawless, threw in the towel.

  2. A Comparison OF Newspaper Articles- Four Editorials

    The word 'No one' is a pronoun that indicates/refers to people in general so by saying this the reader will be curious to find out as to what it stands for thus they will be enticed to read the article.

  1. The two articles we have looked at for analysis have a common theme - ...

    Following 'hours' comes 'incarcerated'; it has connotations of torture and implies that the people who use sunbeds are killing themselves intentionally. The writer views using sunbeds as an unnatural habit, because 'hi-tech' things are usually man-made. 'Coffins' are associated with death, and reinforces the idea of self-destruction.

  2. Comparing newspapers,The Sun, a tabloid newspaper and The Telegraph, a broadsheet newspaper which went ...

    Lastly from analysing the two articles of the same incident, one from a broadsheet and the other from a tabloid, I can conclude that their layouts, audience, language, interviews, neutrality, tone and whether they include a message are all different.

  1. Compare two newspaper articles.

    While the author of article one is a lot more calm and collected. For example, both writers talk about David Blunkett and the handling of the Sangatte refugee centre in Calais. Article one comments 'David Blunkett said he was going to try to get to grips with the asylum problem, well he had better do more than bloody try'.

  2. Comparing two newspaper articles

    Out of the entire customer attracting methods, one thing that stands out initially to the buyer is the headline 'Police Probe Harry And Pub Lock-In'. Alliteration is used for the letter P. This gives emphasis to those words that begin with that letter such as Police and Pub.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work