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"Psycho".

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Introduction

"Psycho" Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho"-the movie the world recognised-was first premiered in the home town of New York on the 16th June 1960.The film follows the life and strife of a young beautiful woman Marion Crane, played by the Janet Leigh, who is on the run from the police after stealing $40.000, she manages to find refuge at the Bates motel where she makes her worst mistake possible. During and after the film production of "Psycho" Alfred Hitchcock had his aids buy as many copies as possible of the novel "Psycho"-written by Robert Bloch. Why? To conceal the ending form the public's eye so when the film was shown in cinemas the audience would'nt know the ending. When people found out the title of the movie Hitchcock said it was based on a greek love story "Psyche". Eventually word got out he was in fact lying. so Alfred Hitchcock had to give another descirption of the movie Quote"Story of a young man whose mother is a homicidal maniac". ...read more.

Middle

Differences between and simlarities between the novel and the film. The fisrt similarity between book and film is that Alfred Hitchcock copies the structure of the book and brings it into the film, e.g the order of the book and how it tricks you into thinking that it is a sleazy romantic(book,or film). Then it suddenly turns into a horror movie, proof of this, during the infamous shower scene where Marion Crane gets stabbed to death by "Mother". After this scene the structure was completly changed from a sleazy to getaway to a horror movie. Another similarity is there is a narrator in the movie but not the speaking type. The camera is the film's narrator as it can go close up to people's thoughts. There are other differences and similarities between the book and film, but Hitchcock has completly taken the way the story is told. The irony of the movie is a bit sick for example:Behind Marion Crane's desk at her workplace there is a picture behind her of a swamp, that swamp is where she was left to die. ...read more.

Conclusion

The audience doesn't know its there. The bomb goes off. The audience gets a surprise...Thats all. This time, while the men still didn't know, the audience does. One of the men say "leave" audience is praying for them to do so. But a man says "No wait a minute". The audience groans that is suspense". Also another part of the movie where the camera creates suspense is in the shower scene, Marion Crane is having a shower the camera moves towards the door she does not realise but someone has come in. The person pulls the shower curtain and kills her. The film has had a massive impact on the film industry. It changed the way people came to watch movies at the cinema."Psycho" is the only film that has groosed more than 3 times the amount it took to be made, it took $15.000,000 in its first year.They have even made a cover version of the movie. Everything about that cover was exactly the same the camera angles they even had a Alfred Hitchcock look alike in the movie. Overall Alfred Hitchcock changed the film industry forever. ...read more.

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