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Taking the image of people jumping from the Twin Towers as your starting point, compare and contrast the media coverage of the events of September 11th as reported in a broadsheet newspaper, a tabloid and the television.

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Introduction

Taking the image of people jumping from the Twin Towers as your starting point, compare and contrast the media coverage of the events of September 11th as reported in a broadsheet newspaper, a tabloid and the television. 'The Mirror', 'The Times' and a 'BBC' television report all cover the same horrifying set of events- the September 11th attacks on the twin towers which ultimately changed the world. However each one has tended to focus on these stories from very different angles all aimed at diverse readerships and viewers. 'The Mirror', with its varied use of colloquial language, employs the means of an emotive, emphatic and personalised account to incite shock and disbelief amongst its readers, producing a sensationalist and attractive read. On the other hand, however scandalous the events may have been, 'The Times' has aimed for a more cautious approach to the report, providing its readers with a formal, factual and unbiased account and therefore allowing them to come to their own conclusions on the previous day's happenings. The 'BBC' televised news report has used a mixture of the two, utilizing dramatic visual experiences in addition to an informative and formal background news report relating the events in the very same order that they happened.. ...read more.

Middle

'The Mirror' has intended to evoke its readers' emotions by employing many personalised stories throughout the entire article which portray the suffering the individuals described sustained. These uses of personal human stories in a random disparate order reflect the vast range of individuals in the tower, most of whom died. An example of this is 'Sports store boss Robert James, 43, saw at least five bodies fall. He said: "They looked like rag dolls"'. Thus, one can infer that content wise 'The Mirror's' report is a lot more emotive and has based most of its factual evidence on what numerous individuals at the scene had to say therefore enticing one's own feelings and emotions towards those who suffered and died. Moreover, this gives the article a heightened realism seeing that all the people quoted most probably have similar jobs and lives to those reading the account. On the contrary, 'The Times' report has a much more formal, factual and political slant to the way it describes the events and there is little individualisation. In 'The Times' the reaction of numerous world leaders and their governments gives a much broader picture and the credibility of quote is increased since they come from official sources such as '"Terrorism against our nation will not stand," President Bush declared...'. ...read more.

Conclusion

with the voice over adding solemn words to match the sombre images it describes: 'And then the World Trade Centre, proud symbol that it was, of the wealthiest city in the world, was no more." This visibly highlights the importance of the towers and in turn, the significance of the events, proving to be an effective ending to the report. The three media reports have achieved their aims but in different ways. 'The Mirror' article has plainly been able to achieve its aim of horrifying, evoking and emoting its readership with informal, colloquial and expletive language in addition to plenty of personal quote use. Paragraphs and sentences are short in order to prolong readers' attention. 'The Times', although non-colloquial and restrained, has still managed to sustain its readership's interest through its varied sentence structures and informative tone as well as ample facts and concrete evidence from a variety of official sources to back them up. Finally, the BBC televised news report has also managed its aim of horrifying and shocking its viewers with the visual experiences provided and the informative, descriptive, factual yet reserved background voiceover. Thus, for the above reasons, it can be concluded that all three have reached their targets and aims for their readerships or viewers although in many different ways of conducting their approach. By Mohsen Khairaldin-Garcia, 10Y ...read more.

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