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The animated sitcom "The Simpsons" subverts our views about a nuclear family. Instead we learn by watching a dysfunctional family. We see the ups and downs and humour of family life in various episodes and typical family situations.

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Introduction

The Simpsons Heenal 10N The animated sitcom "The Simpsons" subverts our views about a nuclear family. Instead we learn by watching a dysfunctional family. We see the ups and downs and humour of family life in various episodes and typical family situations. "The Simpsons" to some degree follow the conventions of a stereotypical sitcom. I will be analysing the episode 'Bart gets an F' to support my thoughts. In this paragraph I will be referring to what a sitcom is, how it has changed throughout the years and why sitcoms are so popular. A sitcom is a 22 minute long show, which presents the viewer with a 'world' within the show. A sitcom also follows the narrative structure of orientation, complication, resolution, evaluation and re-orientation. The creators of "The Simpsons" satirize stereotypes to create humour. In the 1950's sitcoms, the families would get along, listen to each other, take care of each other and they would be smartly dressed at all times. However, after the 1950's it all seemed to change: no-one would get along, they will always argue, the mother and father would always fight and they would do whatever they wished. Sitcoms are very popular as they provide us with entertainment including laughter, which helps people get away from their daily routine life. ...read more.

Middle

The main plot is after failing a history test, Bart strikes a deal with Martin Prince to make Martin cool in return for tutoring Bart, if Bart doesn't improve, he will be held back in his grade (complication). Bart successfully transforms Martin from the clever, caring, sensitive, high-quality boy into a rude, playful naughty and regular kid, bur Martin fails on his side of the bargain and Bart is once again in danger of failing. After an all-night study session, Bart still fails but he manages to impress Mrs. Krabappel with his grasp of history (resolution) and she gives him a D-minus. Homer is proud to hang this grade up on the fridge (evaluation). After the excitement, Bart kisses the teacher and then after realizes what he has done and starts to spit on the floor with disgust (re-orientation). In this episode we see both sides of a traditional family and a dysfunctional family. Expectations of characters are satirised. An example of this is the parents. We expect the parents to praise, support, care and teach their children. But in "The Simpsons" we see the parents encouraging their son not to study. They show that they have no faith in Bart as they call him 'Dim'. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Simpsons have four fingers and they are yellow skinned. The characters of "The Simpsons" create humour by using repeated catch phrases, example 'Doh!' 'Don't have a cow man!' We find the various actions of the characters humorous, as they are well known for example Homer strangles Bart when he is frustrated. Overall, I believe "The Simpsons" are popular because of all the types of humour used during the episodes. This humour appeals to a wide range of audiences. "The Simpsons" is a very popular and well-known sitcom. The appeal of the Simpsons is greatly due to the fact that it appeals to all types of people. People of all ages find humour in it because of the fact that the characters never grow older, the use of flashbacks and flashfowards, the variety of episodes and the characters always turn back to the way they started. A reason why we can tell it is a true sitcom is because they always have a complication that occurs which is later resolved. "The Simpsons" as a sitcom, is well known worldwide. It is broadcast in 100 countries. The influence of "The Simpsons" has created programs like "South Park", "Ren and Stimpy" and "Fresh Prince of Bel Air". The Simpsons are not a stereotypical family, they are dysfunctional and are satirized, and this is the main reason why they have remained so popular. ...read more.

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