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The Making of JAVA

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Introduction

The Making of JAVA Programming Language Before JAVA Bjarne Stroustrup invented C++ in 1979, while was working at Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, New Jersey. Stroustrup initially called the new language "C with Classes." However, in 1983, the name was changed to C++. C++ extends C by adding object-oriented features. Because C++ is built upon the foundation of C, it includes all of C's features, attributes, and benefits. This is a crucial reason for the success of C++ as a language. The invention of C++ was not an attempt to create a completely new programming language. Instead, it was an enhancement to an already highly successful one. C++ was standardized in November 1997, and an ANSI/ISO standard for C++ is now available. The Stage Is Set For JAVA By the end of the 1980s and the early 1990s, object-oriented programming using C++ took hold. Indeed, for a brief moment it seemed as if programmers had finally found the perfect language. Because C++ blended the high efficiency and stylistic elements of C with object-oriented paradigm, it was a language that could be used to create a wide range of programs. ...read more.

Middle

As you can probably guess, many different types of CPUs are used as controllers. The trouble with C and C++(and most other languages) is that they are designed to be compiled for a specific target. Although it is possible to compile a C++ program for just about any type of CPU, to do so requires a full C++ compiler targeted for that CPU. The problem is that compilers are expensive and time-consuming to create. An easier - and more cost-efficient - solution was needed. In an attempt to find such a solution, Gosling and others began work on a portable platform-independent language that could be used to produce code that would run on a variety of CPUs under differing environments. This effort ultimately led to the creation of Java. About the time that the details were being worked out, a second, and ultimately more important, factor was emerging that would play a crucial role in the future of Java. This second force was, of course, the World Wide Web. Had the Web not taken shape at about that same time that Java was being implemented, Java might have remained a useful but obscure language for programmer's consumer electronics. ...read more.

Conclusion

First, java was designed, tested, and refined by real, working programmers. It is a language grounded in the needs and experiences of the people who devised it. Thus, Java is also a programmer's language. Second, Java is cohesive and logically consistent. Third, except for those constraints imposed by the Internet environment, Java gives you, the programmer, full control. If you program well, your programs reflect it. If you program poorly, your programs reflect that, too. Put differently, Java is not a language with training wheels. It is a language for professional programmers. Because of the similarities between Java and C++, it is tempting to think of Java as simply the "Internet version of C++." However, to do so would be a large mistake. While it is true that Java was influenced by C++, it is not an enhanced version of C++. Java was not designed to replace C++. Java was designed to solve a certain set of problems. C++ was designed to solve a different set of problems. Both will coexist for many years. Java is to Internet programming what C was to system programming: a revolutionary force that will change the world. Thank you ...read more.

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