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Though clubs have been around for a while(in the sense of venues for dance), the 'decade of dance' has only really beenrecognised as starting from the end of the twentieth century, mainly 1988-98 (Meashamet al., 2001). For clubbers, the term refers ...

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Introduction

Though clubs have been around for a while (in the sense of venues for dance), the 'decade of dance' has only really been recognised as starting from the end of the twentieth century, mainly 1988-98 (Measham et al., 2001). For clubbers, the term refers to the survival of dance, despite suppression by authority (McDermott, 1993). However it does not describe one stable and/or coherent dance club scene as such (Garratt, 1998). Rather dance culture during this time was extremely fragmented, and mutate, with many sub-cultures splitting off from each other. Reynolds (1998) and Henderson (1993a) identify three main 'waves': 1988-89 The first 'wave' Acid House 1990-92 The second 'wave' Rave 1993 + The third 'wave' Dance When trying to link ecstasy to dance culture as such, it is important to be clear about which period this drug used is being linked to. How has ecstasy been linked dance club culture? ''...links between British youth, dancing, leisure and indeed drugs can be traced back to another post-war era.'' (Measham et al, 2001, p.20). ...read more.

Middle

It served a spiritual purpose with many clubbers speaking of collective bonding and unity with other clubbers, and of a euphoria and ecstasy within the dance scene (Measham, et al., 2001). Rave scenes promoted unity and got people together: ''Everyone was dancing...going for it big time: dancing for five or six hours, tops off, sweating like fuck...No one wanted a battle. No one was pissed and falling all over you. All anyone wanted to do was dance.'' (Russell David, quoted in Harrison, 1998, p.2) For some, the club scene was just another example of hedonistic, risk-taking youth (Plant & Plant, 1992). There is concern of whether ''getting high'' is not simply about being happy but more to do with risk-taking, as most drugs are illegal. There is a suggestion that as a decline in religious activity took place, dance clubs provided some kind of spiritual relief. dance + drugs = collective social bonding dance + drugs = collective spiritual bonding ''people were walking round like they'd found Christianity'' (Jak, quoted in Garratt, 1998, p.114) ...read more.

Conclusion

(Hill, 1993, p.143) Dance club culture was seen by the authorities as a political threat, which prompted legislative changes and policy initiatives designed to make it harder for raves to be run (Farratt & Taggart, 1990). Perhaps one of the reason there were so many tensions between ravers and the police was because ravers were not given room to express themselves. ''And survival, taking pleasure at a time when misery is all that's on offer, can surely be a political act in itself.'' (Garratt, 1998, p.321) ''For those who participated, it felt at the time like there was great political potential in these gatherings and perhaps this was its significance: the direct personal experience of the power and potential of collective mobilisation, of being a part of a community, regardless of its form or direction.'' (Measham et al., 2001, p.30) According to McRobbie (1999), part of the attraction to dance culture, lay in the possibility of new opportunities it created in terms of jobs in that industry. two major themes of dance clubs: they prioritised dance over sexual encounters, and dance drugs. For women especially, there has become increasing concern of using drugs in clubs, particularly as it alters their state of mind, and can potentially make them more vulnerable (Henderson, 1997). ...read more.

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