• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

A Synoptic analysis of scientific principles in the development of performance What are the differences between an untrained individual and a trained athlete?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

A Synoptic analysis of scientific principles in the development of performance What are the differences between an untrained individual and a trained athlete? In this synoptic analysis I will be talking about the differences in which training effects the body. It will involve all aspects of training that have an effect on the body. Training has a profound effect on the hypertrophy of the heart this happens because when training occurs the heart rate increases to about 180 beats per minute, which for the heart is quite high, so it improves the strength and size of it. ...read more.

Middle

The risk of coronary heart disease is lowered because fat deposits are used in training as energy and they will be constantly be used so the fat will not be present after a while. The fatty deposits also get into the veins and arteries which will in time clog up and create higher blood pressure. The delay of the thresholds on the ATP/PC system and lactic acid system will rise due to the body being more efficient at disposing of poisons that build up in muscles after exercise. ...read more.

Conclusion

Training also increases the stores o ATP and glycogen in the muscles ready to used instantly because people who train often use these substances so the body will put a bigger reserve into the parts of the body where it needs it most which is the muscles. The trained athlete will be will have a higher cognitive domain, this mean that the more vital aspects of the sport such as the rules of a game are used this comes with experience of playing the game. Due to the time the trained athlete has done the games skills it becomes autonomous and also more successful. Often high trained athletes bodies are suited somatotypes to the sport which they have adapted through intense training. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Anatomy & Physiology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Anatomy & Physiology essays

  1. A level Project, Personal Exercise Program on Netball.

    Following any form of fitness training, the body goes through a process of rebuild and repair to replenish its energy reserves consumed by the exercise. The frequency of exercise is a balance between providing just enough stress for the body to adapt to and allowing enough time for healing and adaptation to occur.

  2. Effects of hydration levels on an athlete's performance

    For example, should they be taking in water or sports drinks and what type of sports drinks would be best (e.g. hypertonic, isotonic or hypotonic). Remember to describe why you have chosen a particular method of hydration. An athlete's fluid intake will vary depending on the situation that they are in.

  1. Personal Exercise Program

    Cross Training "Cross training is performing a different activity, sport or exercise, to the one you are used to. For example a long distance runner may do cycling as a cross training exercise, a rower may do running or circuit training".

  2. The skeletal systems relative to Sport and exercise actions

    The upper end of the ulna articulates with the lower end of the humours forming a strong hinge joint in the elbow region. The lower end of the ulna is slender and plays a minor role in the formation of the wrist joint.

  1. Physiology Within Sport

    The way neurones communicate, for an example say an athlete was trying to lift a weight to carry out a bicep curl, a sensory receptor would detect the force being applied along with the signal from the brain to signal that a force is being applied and it needs to

  2. Movement within the Body and the Cardiovascular System

    through the tricuspid valve, with out this synchronous wave the systole would be less efficient and so the blood being transported to the active muscle would be in a lesser amount directly effecting how long and how well an athlete could perform their skill, e.g.

  1. Biological Chemicals and Their Role in Sport

    (B) Fats Fats are also another source of energy; these however, release energy much slower than carbohydrates. We tend to use fat as a reserve energy store after burning all of our carbohydrates.

  2. Discuss the differences between skill, technique and ability and explain how 'practice makes perfect'

    Perceptual can also be explained as the process by which you sense things and interpret them. In sport, you use this skill, for example to determine where and when to pass the ball or in judging the type of shot to play in gold.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work