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Acquisition of close-up magic skills.

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Introduction

Group Project Acquisition of close-up magic skills INTRODUCTION What are the main principles behind learning? This project will attempt to analyse and evaluate different methods of learning so that a justifiable conclusion can be drawn as to what actually effects and improves individual and group learning. The selected activity to be learnt by our group is close up magic. After brainstorming all the possibilities this was chosen as a couple of people had had limited experience, but were willing to progress, and the others despite being novices were interested but most importantly for learning, motivated. The art of magic is obviously quite broad, so therefore offers scope for learning but should be straightforward to evaluate. If we are to define the process of learning as the absorption of information that is subsequently reflected by behaviour, by the end of this particular task the behaviour concerned will be an assortment of magic tricks that can be performed with skill, spontaneity and confidence. To assist with individual learning it is vital that external information sources exist, as this is again why learning magic should be relatively successful. From our own knowledge we can rely on material from books, the Internet and possibly videos. This is in addition to our previous experiences and knowledge that can be demonstrated and learnt on a group level. The overriding importance of this project is not necessarily to be able to perform the skill with complete success but instead identify different learning (and also teaching) processes and evaluate their effectiveness. These may be for example group work, individual research, lecturing from one individual to the group or through the use of visual aids such as a video or handout. All of which are current methods of learning but undoubtedly they'll all have varying degrees of practicality within this context. Initial thoughts on this project lead towards the fact that it will be a challenge and that roles and identities within the group have already been constructed. ...read more.

Middle

Inevitably the degrees of success were variable and it was often the case that flexibility was required in order to adopt the learning method to suit the context. Being an individual skill kinaesthetic information was important accompanied by visual observations, this type of feedback often determined the course of each session. Undoubtedly each member of the group learnt differently and acquired different levels of skill with each magic trick attempted. Often learning was multi-dimensional and other aspects such as other member's skills and abilities were also learnt in addition to the magic itself. A summary of each individuals learning progress can be offered: * Mark - Learnt most efficiently through practical demonstrations, something deemed successful for learning cognitive skills. It was felt that confidence increased through both adopting and attempting different learning methods and with the magic itself. * Will - Learning was achieved by both a guided and task approach. A clear associative level had been achieved in many of the magic tricks, through mainly being directed by the teacher and then enhancing on this knowledge with practical experimentation. * Jo - Another context where confidence was increased dramatically as the acquisition of certain skills became more competent. Here a command style was possibly felt to be most effective. This may have been due to limited previous experience in terms of magic but with step-by-step guidance offered ability was greatly improved. Reflexively learning was evident within this environment with the learner, in addition to the skill, realising their own ability and which skills they can effectively adopt. * Alex - Again a guided discovery method was thought to be most effective. Previous knowledge and experience was already present and it was a case of extending this through individual research. In order to extend the level of ability to an autonomous phase it was important that the skill could be performed and adopted to various environments, this is something that continues to be worked upon. ...read more.

Conclusion

With magic tricks our group found that more interactive styles were useful, those that involved plenty of feedback and evaluation as well as those that allowed practice in order to enhance accuracy. The more command like styles were less effective within this context due to a lack of coherence, especially if the technique or skill required further demonstrations than just those given. As a starting block for future investigations into pedagogy it should be remembered that learning can be achieved in many different ways, through many over lapping strategies. Planning is always paramount, as the teaching approach should always have a close correlation to the complexity of the skill and the ability of the student. Any session in the mind of the teacher should have clear guidelines but at the same time possess a degree of flexibility, as the learning environment will be forever changing. REFERENCING AND RESEARCH METHODS Carroll, J.B. 1963. A model of school learning, Teaching College record; 64: pp. 723-33 Hardy, C et al. 1999, Learning and Teaching in Physical Education Falmer Press Huber, G. 2003, Processes of decision-making in small learning groups: University of T´┐Żbingen; Volume 13, Issue 3. pp. 255-269 Metzler, M. 2000, Instructional Models for Physical Education Pearson Education Mortimore, P. 1999. Understanding Pedagogy and its impact on learning, Paul Chapman Publishers; pp. 86-88 Rink, J. 1993, Teaching Physical Education for Learning Mosby-Year Book inc. Underwood, G, L. 1988, Teaching and learning in physical education. A social psychological perspective. Redwood Burn Limited, Trowbridge, Wiltshire; pp.31 http://members.shaw.ca/mdde615/lrnstycats.htm#visual) visited 20/10/03 RESEARCH AND MATERIAL USED AS LEARNING SOURCERS INTERNET * http://allmagic.com/magicshow/movies/ Accessed 30/11/03 Visual magic trick demonstration - online video * http://gcgordy.crosswinds.net/master-system.html Accessed 2/11/03 Magic trick descriptions and methods * http://www.geocities.com/jhnsnoot/card-flipper-trick.html Accessed 25/10/03 Several basic magic tricks - used as instruction cards LITERATURE * Fields, K. Holland, C. 1989. Magic For All. David and Charles, Newton Abbot, London Information and methods regarding a wide variety of close up magic skills * Hugard, J. 165 Card Tricks and Stunts. Mackays of Chatham PLC, Kent Close-up, sleight of hand magic skills IN ADDITION * Skill's obtained from individual research and previous knowledge. ...read more.

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