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Analyse the Current Application of monitoring and Training technology to enhance sport performance

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Introduction

Technology in Sport Task 3 Heart Rate Monitors The first wireless heart rate monitor (HRM) was introduced in 1983 and since then many improvements have been made e.g. * Coded transmission process (from chest strap to watch) to reduce interference with other HRMs * Ability to capture large amounts of data * Functions to aid with training e.g. high and low ranges for setting training zones * Ability to download the captured data onto a computer and then analyse with special software * Ability to determine your VO2 max The heart rate monitor is a personal training device that allows a user to measure their heart rate in real time. It usually consists of two elements: a chest strap transmitter and a wrist receiver or mobile phone (which usually doubles as a watch or phone). Strapless heart rate monitors are available as well, but lack some of the functionality of the original design. Advanced models additionally measure heart rate variability and breathing rate to assess a user's fitness. The use of an HRM to set exercise intensity is based on sound physiological principals - as the work increases, oxygen consumption (VO2) and heart rate increases in a linear relationship until near maximal intensities. ...read more.

Middle

Caffeine is a performance enhancer as it is a central nervous system stimulant and has been used by some athletes as an ergogenic aid in endurance exercise. Caffeine does not seem to benefit short-term high intensity exercise. Prolonged and frequent caffeine intake can lead to excessive nervousness, and can result in a condition known as "caffeinism", causing restlessness, anxiety, diarrhoea, headaches, and heart palpitations. In addition to this, caffeine has a diuretic effect which can rob the body of its water supply. Blood doping involves putting extra blood into the body which increases the level of haemoglobin thereby providing an increased oxygen carrying capacity for delivery to, and use by, the working muscles. The extra blood used can be the athlete's which has been previously withdrawn or can be another persons. Blood doping is banned in sport because of the potential dangers to an athlete's health and the unfair advantages associated with the practice. The risks associated with blood doping are bacterial infections, congestive heart failure, hypertension and blood clots. Amphetamines act as stimulants of the central nervous system and the sympathetic division of the peripheral nervous system, and have been used by some athletes to enhance performance. ...read more.

Conclusion

For many years, coaches and athletes have sought to improve power in order to enhance performance. Throughout this century and no doubt long before, jumping, bounding and hopping exercises have been used in various ways to enhance athletic performance. In recent years, this distinct method of training for power or explosiveness has been termed plyometrics. Whatever the origins of the word the term is used to describe the method of training that seeks to enhance the explosive reaction of the individual through powerful muscular contractions because of rapid eccentric con tractions. Plyometric type exercises have been used successfully by many athletes as a method of training to enhance power. In order to realise the potential benefits of plyometric training the stretch-shortening cycle must be invoked. This requires careful attention to the technique used during the drill or exercise. The rate of stretch rather than the magnitude of stretch is of primary importance in plyometric training. In addition, the coupling time or ground contact time must be as short as possible. The challenge to you as coach or athlete is to select or create an exercise that is specific to the event and involves the correct muscular action. As long as you remember specificity and to ensure there is a pre stretch first then the only limit is your imagination. Task 3 Unit 9 Analyse the Current Application of monitoring and Training technology To Enhance sport Performance ...read more.

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