• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Comment on the role of the 'coaching point' and discuss how its nature changes as the performer moves through the stages of learning

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Comment on the role of the 'coaching point' and discuss how its nature changes as the performer moves through the stages of learning. A coaching point is the information a coach will provide in order to further and enhance learning and understanding of the task. Fitts and Posner (1967) suggested that the learning process is sequential and that we move through specific phases as we learn. There are three stages to learning a new skill and these are: * Cognitive phase - Identification and development of the component parts of the skill - involves formation of a mental picture of the skill * Associative phase - Linking the component parts into a smooth action - involves practicing the skill and using feedback to perfect the skill * Autonomous phase - Developing the learned skill so that it becomes automatic - involves little or no conscious thought or attention whilst performing the skill - not all performers reach this stage The leaning of physical skills requires the relevant movements to be assembled, component by component, using feedback to shape and polish them into a smooth action. Rehearsal of the skill must be done regularly and correctly. ...read more.

Middle

The last major point in the cognitive stage of learning is the feedback the coach gives (confirming). This could be seen as the most important part, it both helps the coach understand what has been learned but to also encourage the leaner to be self-evaluative and reinforces learning plus boosts the moral of the learner. The coach would use verbal guidance throughout this stage but with the learner being a beginner it may be more appropriate to express the cues in ways that may not be 100% accurate, but convey the feeling of movement to the learner. E.g. 'Stretch you toes to the ceiling' or 'crocodile, monkey, mouse' (the arm movement in breast stroke). The next stage of learning (the associative phase) the coach would have to change how they encounter the problem of teaching the learner the correct amount of information. Sharp (1992) differentiates between 'practice' (without guidance) and 'training' (practice with guidance). The learner would need to practice on there own without guidance at some point but long periods could prove demotivating. It could also allow the development of errors without techniques/skills learnt that take a lot of removing which could waste up to 6 month. ...read more.

Conclusion

visual aids in this way would also help the athlete to set new targets which is very important at an elite status so that the learner just don't give up. A good example of this was Colin Jackson; he was and still is the record holder of the indoor 60m hurdles and outdoor 110m hurdles. In 2002 he set himself a target of winning three international honours - the first he captured in Vienna in March winning the European Indoor 60m hurdles title for the fourth time. In summer 2002 he missed out on adding a third Gold medal to his Commonwealth tally after hitting the first hurdle but recovered amazingly to claim his second Silver medal in this event. The European Championships in Munich saw Colin bring home the Gold medal for the 4th time. Colin Jackson is now retired but setting targets with his coaches helped him mentally and made him able to strive for an objective than he could possible have done. Through all of these stages the coach is helping the athlete to progress, each stage having its very own way of teaching. Each stage is different to the other but has the same effect on the athlete, to enhance there progression of learning. Word Count - 1233 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Acquiring, Developing & Performance Skill section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Acquiring, Developing & Performance Skill essays

  1. Fitts and Posner's model identifies three phases or stages of learning.

    more confident with encouragement he is given them and feedback they will begin to run with the ball and make it almost look like a basketball lay up.

  2. Construct and rationalise a coaching methodology for developing and performing: a) Front Somersault Tucked ...

    Powerfully explode through the shoulders in an attempt to rise off the floor. After popping off the floor the gymnast can either land back on the hands, rotate to the back (onto a soft surface), or forward roll out of it.

  1. Football - coaching points.

    Place non-kicking foot next to ball, about 8-10 inches away from the ball. 3. Lean forward in order to get the head and body weight over the ball. 4. With toes pointing downward, strike the centre of the ball with the laces of the boot.

  2. Analyse the nature of a skilled performer

    High ball to a big player , low ball to small player , defensive/ offensive etc. Perceptual Skills: Skill which involves the detection and interpretation of information e.g how well you read the game, understand what's going on around you, Motor Skills: Skill which involves movement and muscular control e.g

  1. Collect information to prepare to coach

    The composition of the training will depend on the requirements of individuals. C Skill Skill involves learning to execute a technique with the minimum effort to achieve predetermined effects. There are many different kinds of skill. Fine motor skills require delicate muscular control (used in activities such as putting and

  2. Free essay

    stress and risk

    Someone can buy or sell just about anything without having to rely on traditional distribution channels. At one time, these channels more often than not played as great a role in pricing and distribution as the manufacturing of the product itself.

  1. The role of feedback

    This can be also be related to Thorndike's 'laws', mainly the law of effect. (See appendix 2 for definitions.) Also the feedback given by a coach will depend on the learning phase the performer is at, if they are in the cognitive phase then they will need a lot of

  2. Sports Psychology Reseach Project - using dissociative and associative strategies for helping concentration.

    Beginning Middle End Toby 3 4 NOT HERE Jack 3 3.3 3.5 Tom 3 3 3 Glen 3 3 4 Gus 2.49 3.3 3.93 Sarah 3 4 4 Tavis 3 3.2 3.9 Chelsea 3.5 3.5 3.5 Nick 2 3 4 Cameron 3 3.5 3.8 Average 2.88 3.36 3.72 Table 2:

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work