• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Discuss the differences between skill, technique and ability and explain how 'practice makes perfect'

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Discuss the differences between skill, technique and ability and explain how 'practice makes perfect' In this piece of coursework I will incorporate skill, technique and ability to explain whether or not 'practise makes perfect'. Skill is made up of a number of characteristics, such as; Coordinated, Controlled, Technique, Aesthetic, Learned, Consistent, Pre-determined, Efficient. To perform at an elite status it is safe to say that the sportsperson will need to have exceptional skill, ability and technique to achieve their individual goals. Ability can be defined as an inherited, innate and generally enduring traits that an individual possesses, allowing them to complete various tasks. Certain skills require specific abilities, which can be broadly categorised into psychomotor ability and gross motor ability. The former involves the processing of information and initiation of the movement, e.g. coordination and reaction time; the later involves actual movement e.g. flexibility, strength, stamina, balance and speed. (Complete A-Z PE). In contrast skill is said to be the learned ability to bring about pre-determined results with maximum certainty, often with the minimum outlay of time, energy or both. Performers who are said to be skilled often display similar characteristics including consistency, efficiency, coordination, fluency, whilst completing a recognised technique allowing them to successfully achieve an end goal. ...read more.

Middle

Technique is yet again different to both ability and skill, technique can be learnt and changed so it is not inherited, a elite long jumper is not born with technique but can practise and learn the specific movements on how to approach the board and also the specific movements on how to take off from the board and what to do in the air. A key role in practise is whether it is variable or fixed (which directly links to massed, distributed practises and whole and whole/part approach). * Variable practise- training which allows an open skill to be practiced in a variety of situations to allow a strong schema to be established. For example this sort of practise could be used for football training where the player practises their dribbling around cones and then dribbling differently. * Fixed practice- a specific movement pattern is practised repeatedly. Often known as 'drills'. A good example of this is basketball drills, where the individual just practises their shooting over and over again. * Massed- the skill is practised until learned without taking any breaks, a good example of this technique is long distance training which usually consists of the athlete running a distance (maybe 800metres or 400metres depending on their event but always a lower distance from the event they compete in) ...read more.

Conclusion

Wilkinson is one of the best rugby union fly half in the world and trains every day for several hours just taking conversions (the ideal model for the argument 'practise makes perfect') and usually gets all of the conversions but a human can't be perfect and even he misses a few ( 0.2%) , this must prove that even the most dedicated of sportsmen/sportswomen, even if they practise all the time, cannot be perfect as their are always surrounding environmental issues such as pressure which need to be taken into account when performing the skill. Referring to the title 'practise makes perfect', practise is said to be; 'A set of processes associated with practice or experience leading to relatively permanent changes in the capability of skilled performance' (R.Schmidt. Sport and PE) 'A change in the capability of the individual to perform a skill that must be inferred from a relatively permanent improvement in performance as a result of practise or experience' (R.Magill. Sport and PE) My conclusion is that practise can't make perfect. Nothing that exists is perfect, an athlete can seem to be the best in the world and the best that people have ever seen but if you examine every movement of the athlete (incorporating ability, technique and skill) they are not perfect. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Anatomy & Physiology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Anatomy & Physiology essays

  1. Free essay

    Body In Action

    Branches of the nerve and blood vessels follow the connective tissue components of the muscle of a nerve cell and with one or more minute blood vessels called capillaries. In the body, there are three types of muscle: skeletal (striated), smooth, and cardiac.

  2. Physiology Within Sport

    more flexible, this is similar to the heart, because the Venous return has been increased the heart walls have to in fact stretch more to enable the increased amount of blood to fit within the walls of the heart, this is why there is also a larger volume of blood

  1. Strength coursework.

    Endurance strength is needed so that we are able to keep up with our opponents as our muscles may have to work for prolong periods of time. Defenders when marking their opponent by reaching out to mark the ball need static strength.

  2. Different Types of Mental Training

    Think about when you have seen a rugby player take a kick at goal from the ground. They place the ball then look up at the posts, take a few steps back and to the side, take a stance, look at the ball then up to the posts, sometime close

  1. Discuss the role of feedback in the learning of skills

    This is essential to learning new skills because it lets the athlete no what part/s of the shill/sequence not to change.(1) E.g. in a serve in tennis a coach might tell the player that the height of the throw and connection with the ball was good so they no not

  2. Biological Chemicals and Their Role in Sport

    to the muscles during the performance. If an athlete ingests carbohydrates 3-4 hours before a competition then it increases the liver and muscles glycogen, again this raises the level of endurance and performance. (B) Dieticians recommend that the average person's diet should be made up of about 47% carbohydrates, with the majority of these coming from starchy foods (complex CHOs).

  1. Body In Action

    The bronchi then divide up into smaller bronchioles. The bronchioles enable the air to pass into the alveoli, where diffusion takes place. Alveoli are tiny air-filled sacs for gaseous exchange between the lungs and the blood. There are many millions alveoli in the lungs, which provides an enormous surface area.

  2. A level Project, Personal Exercise Program on Netball.

    The left foot was placed to the ground as the dominant foot and then the toes of the right foot were levelled. Footwork can be an issue if it keeps being identified by the umpire as an offence. It can affect the game by giving a free pass to the opposite team.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work