• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

fitts and posner

Extracts from this document...


Describe "Fitt's and Posner's" phases of learning and explain how you would structure practices to enhance performance Learning is a more or less permanent change in performance brought about by experience (Knapp, 1973). This is a widely accepted theory of the definition of learning. However ...no one learning theory provides us with all the answers to why an individual learns the way they do (Grant, 2002). In this assignment I will be analysing the theories of Fitts and Posner (1967) and explaining how these ideas could be used to enhance the training and practices of a performer to improve performance. Fitts and Posner (1967) were some of the first people to take a systematic look at skill acquisition. They suggested that the learning process is sequential and that we move through specific phases as we learn. The stages are hierarchical. Movement through each phase takes time and regular practice is required to make the necessary improvements for the performer to make a smooth transition into the next phase of learning. Also the learner may move back a stage, depending on the situation. ...read more.


In the cognitive phase of learning to play tennis, the performer struggles with all basic actions and using the racket seems awkward. Demonstrations performed by a coach of how to grip the racket and create a swing allow performer to build a mental image of the perfect model, they can begin to understand the required movements. The coach can instruct them to stand close to the net and can hit him/her balls and get them to knock them back over the net, offering simple constructive feedback after every ten or so shots giving them a chance to make the changes. With practice, the movements and motor programmes will become smoother and the successfulness of the trail and improvement will increase. As they improve and build in confidence the coach can push them back to the baseline and make them play the same shots as previously. Associative phase - during this transition phase the performer will practice the skills they have acquired and compare their actions to that of and elite performer or "the perfect model" with the aid of a coach. ...read more.


The first level of motor control can be related to this phase and is often referred to as open loop control, temporal patterning has been almost perfected and results are consistently correct. They will be at an expert level of competence due to lengthy practices, and the motor programme is used to control movements. The speed efficiency and consistency of the performance increases, performers are more able to analyze their own performance and use intrinsic feedback more than extrinsic rewards. The performance is therefore smooth and efficient and can be triggered by one stimulus, leaving plenty of attention to use on finer elements of the skill. Not all performers reach the autonomous phase. If practice is not maintained, reversion to the associative phase will occur. When a player reaches this level in tennis, for example the player would be able to serve whilst contemplating what their opponent will do next, rather than being unduly concerned about the mechanics of serving. The player can make shots manipulating the decision of their opponent and can think many shots ahead as the technical aspects of the shots no longer need to be thought about. All actions are fluent and appear effortless however a long period of time away from practice can cause perform to loose their "sharpness". ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Acquiring, Developing & Performance Skill section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Acquiring, Developing & Performance Skill essays

  1. My Training Programme.

    because these sessions posed the most strain on my arms. I was not out of breath as much in the third session because I had increased my resting times and I also did not complete the tests before my session.

  2. Personal Exercise Programme (PEP).

    - Ab crunch: I completed the first two sets with 30 kg without any problems. However, I could not even manage to carry out one repetition of the third set, so I dropped the weight right down to 15 kg. I did a further set (6 repetitions) with this weight.

  1. Self analysis of weaknesses in table tennis - Comparison to elite model 2

    This is due to the high speed range of the game, but training is the same pace, rather than in a gaming situation the speed of the ball differs throughout therefore I have the judge different speed of ball, which I don't feel trained enough to do.

  2. Elite Performer 2

    for the other players, I feel Ryan did this very well as the team were very relaxed and went on to win 4-0. Physiological Comment Speed 7/10. As Ryan's getting onto the end of his career he is starting to loose some of his fitness and pace that he had in his previous seasons for the club.

  1. Purpose And Aim Of Training Programme.

    speed, I will use it most often because it will work effectively on my endurance. Some people may choose a specific training principle for a specific part of their body and so, to meet the demands for a specific sport.

  2. Personal Exercise Programme

    aggression and full preparation on the rugby pitch). The warm up should be specific to the activity that follows it, using the relevant muscles and energy systems i.e. if you are about to take part in a swimming race, there is no point warming up for it by going for a jog.

  1. Synoptic Assignment

    In contrary, verbal guidance has its negative aspects as well. Some techniques are incredibly difficult to describe in a verbal manner and would require the use of visual cues as well. Moreover, depending on the ability of the performer and their understanding capabilities, it is hard to be able to relate to the given performer(s)

  2. fitts and posner

    When things are performed correctly its important that they are recognised and that the performer is told that it is correct as this will give the him/her a positive attitude and make her less conscious if she is doing it right or not.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work