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Progressive Practices

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Introduction

Before running, the person would be advised to do warm ups i.e. drills about the distance of 40 metres. This would also act as a practice for my chosen skill, (Striding) First of all I would watch the person run and then I would change his/her technique so it looks suitable to match my skill i.e. striding. I would look for: - * Movement-coordination, rhythmic rather than the stiff and mechanical. * Check if the hands/feet swing too far in front of the body. * I would check if the hands/feet swing too low, with limited elbow bend and heel kick-up. * Also the movement is powered by "reaching and pulling" instead of "loading and firing". ...read more.

Middle

* Keeping your forearm at heart height, reach back with the other arm so you can thrust your chest forward, properly aligning your body so that you can drive your leg effectively. There are a lot more kinds of practices that can change the speed of your running, which is very important in the 100 metres. These are: * Running for a longer distance, probably around 120-160 metres. This would help you to increase your pace and it would also test your stamina. * Bringing up your thigh as high as you can, just below chest height. Doing this for both legs for a long period of time would help you with your limb speed. If this is repeated very often as part of a training programme you would be able to move your legs more higher (which is an important issue in striding) ...read more.

Conclusion

Speed is obviously the top priority for a sprinter, in the 100 metres you should be able to maintain your top speed for the course of the race without slowing down at any point. Pyramids These are called pyramids because an athlete builds up to a maximum distance and then winds down the other side. A 100/200m pyramid should be: 200m 150m 150m 100m 100m 50m 50m Allow yourself a set time to rest between sprints, three minutes is probably best. As you get fitter, reduce your rest time between sprints. Hill Sprints Find a steep grassy hill, sprint to the top concentrating on driving hard with your arms and legs. This is an excellent exercise for building up leg and shoulder muscles and developing drive from the rear leg. Abid Zaman ...read more.

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