• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Review The Classification Of Skills To Include The Differences Between Individual, Co-active And Interactive Skills

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Review The Classification Of Skills To Include The Differences Between Individual, Co-active And Interactive Skills Introduction: There is a large range of sporting activities each requiring a set of skills. Skills have many characteristics that can change in different situations, which makes classifying them difficult. Accepting that skills cannot be neatly labelled, we place them on a continuum. Most skill classification systems are based on the view that motor skills are affected by three factors: * how precise a movement is * whether the movement has a definite beginning and end * whether the environment affects the performance of the skill SKILL = ABILITY + TECHNIQUE A skill is the performers ability to choose and perform the right techniques at the right time, successfully and at the right time with minimum effort. Performers use their skill to achieve certain objectives for them. E.g. sprinting a 10.0 second 100m. Skill is acquired and therefore has to be learnt. There are three types of skill: 1. Cognitive (involves thought processes) 2. Perceptual (involves interpretation of information) 3. Motor (involves movement) Techniques are the basic movements of any sport or event e.g. ...read more.

Middle

These skills are usually closed skills, for example the javelin throw where the performer can within a reasonable amount of time take as long as he or she wants. The performer such as in the golf drive instigates self-paced skills; a player hits the ball when they are ready and not because they have been told to play the shot within a certain time range. Externally paced: skills are when an outside instigator such as the environment or opponent controls the timing of the performance of the skill by the performer. To control the rate of movement by the performer they must pay attention to the external events. Usually open skills involving alot of reaction on the performers part i.e. in football the performer must time his or hers actions with their opponents and teams mates as well as the ball. When a player passes a football he becomes the starter whom controls the start and when the return ball is played when it reaches his partner. The return ball though is not fully externally paces as his partner is able to choose whether he shall take the ball late or early. ...read more.

Conclusion

Therefore open skills are usually externally paced, and continuous e.g. a pass in rugby. Closed: skills are performed in more stable environments. They are self-paced and discrete skills. An example of this is in football: a penalty is a closed skill because the conditions are the same each time; the goal is 12 yards away. But in some situations the conditions are different such as in a free kick where the kick can be taken from many different positions on the pitch. This means that conditions are always changing. Because there are no outside physical influences on the performer, the closed skills can be improved which also makes training very easy. One a closed skill has been learnt they should be performed in exactly the same way each time. For example in football the penalty takers skill is exactly the same each time they take the penalty, because of no outside physical factors interfering. It all takes place in a stable, predictable environment so skills aren't affected and tend to be habitual. A closed skill such as this has a clear beginning and end, is self-paced and follows set patterns. Skills can be categorised on the continuum [right], between 0 (closed) and 10 (open), depending on the degree to which outside factors influence the performance of a skill. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Acquiring, Developing & Performance Skill section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Acquiring, Developing & Performance Skill essays

  1. Performance analysis of passing and tackling in rugby.

    Health Benefits of Rugby: Rugby being a physical sport aids both the muscular and skeletal system. If you have a negative and inactive lifestyle, then you can get bone disorders and suffer from general wear and tear. You can get such disorders as osteoporosis and growth plate injuries.

  2. PEP basketball

    similar to the Multi-Stage fitness test is a very valid test, possibly less reliable than that of the multi stage fitness test. On this scale I am shown as "good" and I feel that this has not given me an accurate representation of my current ability.

  1. Techniques, Rules and Tactics of Football

    restarted by an indirect free kick, to be taken by a player of the opposing team from the place where the ball was located when play was stopped. Players and Substitutes Sent Off * A player who has been sent off before the kick-off may be replaced only by one of the named substitutes.

  2. AS Sport Studies Written Project: Football Skills

    * He didn't sacrifice accuracy as it was aimed directly * Didn't try to use his arms for balance for enhanced shooting * The basics were a low drive with the instep, but he increased the power by bringing the kicking leg through quickly and increasing the follow through.

  1. Netball Attacking skills.

    the game where you have to release the ball very quickly and besides that, the rule of netball only allows the ball to be in your possession for 3 seconds. The distance between the feeders increases further, so much that the two feeders are on the same horizontal line as the worker.

  2. Critically analyse your own performance in your chosen sport using suitable notational methods. Include ...

    * Light jog, kick around followed by light stretching FRIDAY Gym work Since a cricketer needs to have strong upper body strength I though that two weight sessions a week would help develop my overall strength and fitness. FRIDAY 35 minute run SPEED: 12 Kmph DISTANCE: 7000m EXERCISE SETS REPS

  1. Analysis of My performance In Rugby

    After each week I will lift an extra 0.5kg eventually I will be lifting 10kg weights but still doing low reps to build up my static strength in my arms. To build my core stability to a higher level in the 3rd week I will introduce a 5kg medicine ball

  2. A2 Practical Assessment Of Rugby

    There are a few things that need to be done for the maul to be successful; this includes getting as low as possible and driving it forward. A professional forward rugby player will need to be very low leaning on the player in front of him pumping his legs and driving himself and his team-mates as far as they can.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work