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The energy system Our bodies need a supply of energy to enable it to carry out the functions to live. These functions can be digesting food to live and avoid starving to death, performing muscular contractions to do everyday life such as eating or exerci

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Introduction

Assignment 4-The energy systems The energy system Our bodies need a supply of energy to enable it to carry out the functions to live. These functions can be digesting food to live and avoid starving to death, performing muscular contractions to do everyday life such as eating or exercising, repairing and replacing tissue. Energy come in different forms such as mechanical, chemical, heat and electrical. This energy's can transferred from one form of energy to another one, for example, chemical energy found in food is converted into mechanical energy to enable us to move, or it can always be transformed into potential energy and can be reserved in the body for later use. Another source of energy that is essential for human beings is heat energy. Heat energy is giving off as a by-product when metabolism increases, leading to sweating. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) The body uses one form of energy, that energy is adenosine triphosphate or for shorter can be known as ATP.The chemical basis of energy production is ATP.This energy source is produce when our bodies breaks down the food that we consumed. The food types that contain energy in form of kilocalories (kcals) ...read more.

Middle

An example of using the pc system can be when weight training. In weigh training high intensity is required with little duration; someone performing a chest exercise will normally do 4 sets per exercise with 1-2 minutes rest period. This utilizes the phosphate creatine system because more than 3 seconds of energy is required per set with a rest in between. Another good example of a sporting activity can be the 40 metre sprint. The 40 metre sprint requires the individual to sprint to his/her best potential in less than 8 seconds. After the individual finishes he/she has the recovery ratio of 1:6 to renew the creatine phosphate system. Furthermore some sports need this energy system more than others, for example 40 metres sprint depends on this energy system because it last for 3-8 seconds which is perfect because it nearly matches with the duration of the 40 metres, and the rate of ATP production is really high but other sporting activities like the ultra marathon depends on the other energy source that is aerobic system because that energy lasts for hours unlike the PC energy. Picture of 100 metre sprint needed Lactic acid system Once ATP and PC have run out, our body has another way of providing energy quickly. ...read more.

Conclusion

The aerobic system is needed in sport when we go beyond of 3 minutes of exercising. This system is needed for sport that requires a long duration with low intensity so we can say the opposite of the 100 m which is high intensity and short duration. Sports like marathon, skating 10 k, 50 k walk and 50 k cycle need this system because it goes well with the long duration and low intensity (<60%).However since the aerobic system energy sources are glycogen(carbs) and fat, and both provide good energy source. The fat source can provide us to do longer duration such as the ultra marathon that can last for hours and glycogen can provide us with the energy to do the 5-42km run.Overral this system will be always be used once we exercise for a long duration, but it will always get assisted by the other energy systems because all three systems are always in operation during exercise and even at rest. In the example of a marathon run ,in the first couple of minutes of the race the individual will gain energy from the ATP-CP system and the lactic acid system, until the individual reaches steady state and then the aerobic system can match the demands of the race. ...read more.

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