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The Importance of Fluid Replacement.

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Introduction

The Importance of Fluid Replacement Keeping hydrated is very crucial for an athlete's performance on the field of play. If an athlete does not keep replacing his or her fluids consistently, the undesired effects of dehydration will appear. Athletes with mild dehydration of 1% to 2% of body weight will start losing physiologic function and a drop in performance. Dehydration of greater than 3% of body weight will further disrupt physiologic function and increases the risk of developing an exertional heat illness such as heat cramps, heat exhaustion, or heat stroke, which can lead to death. A coach of a collegiate athletic team should know the dangers of dehydration and have a decent knowledge of fluid replacement in order to maintain the physical condition of the athletes and to enhance individual performances. What are the important facts that a coach should know regarding fluid replacement in order to optimize his or her athletes' performances? ...read more.

Middle

A healthy way to guarantee proper pre-exercise hydration is to consume about 500 to 600 mL of water or a sports drink 2 to 3 hours before exercise and 200 to 300 mL of fluids 10 to 20 minutes before exercise. Also, for pre-exercise hydration, 2-3 hours before exercise, consumption of some carbohydrates (CHOs) along with a normal daily diet can increase glycogen stores and may be desirable. Post-exercise fluid replacement is just as crucial as pre-exercise. Within two hours of activity, rehydration should contain water to restore hydration status, carbohydrates to replenish glycogen stores, and electrolytes to speed rehydration. Consumption of sports drinks is favored for immediate post-exercise rehydration. In events such as tournaments held over a weekend, there are many competitions over only a limited number of days. In these situations, post-exercise fluid replacement becomes crucial in order to keep properly hydrated before each game. ...read more.

Conclusion

If any of these appear, the athlete should take it upon themselves to rehydrate properly. Coaches in a high school setting may not always have athletic trainers to support them with matters like this. In those cases, the coaches must take responsibility to make sure there are fluids available at their practice sessions and games. They also have to keep motivating their high school athletes to start thinking seriously about the concept of hydration. In a high school setting, good, effective rehydration comes from things like being aware of daily lunch menus, or staying away from candy and soda. It must also be taken into consideration that most high school facilities are not as well equipped as in most college settings. In most cases, coaches are responsible for all of their athletes' conditions, so fluid replacement is a good concept to know to keep their kids in shape. 1 ...read more.

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