• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

This case study will closely examine and outline a sports person.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Sarah: a case study This case study will closely examine and outline a sports person. It will provide an insight into the psychological concept of the individual, describe the consequences of this psychological concept and give a theoretical underpinning and possible suggestions of how to explain the individual's behaviour. The individual: The individual in this case study is called Sarah, a 27 year old female, playing table tennis. Having started at the age of 19, she is now in her eighth year of playing, she only started playing regularly and competitive, i.e. twice or three times a week, at the age of 22 when she finally joined a club to enter competitions. She is not only competing for a local club but in addition she is part of the university squad and also plays occasionally for the county team competing in the 2nd division. Even though she is already aged 27, she is still pursuing higher ambitions, playing as a regular team member for the county league and hoping for selection into the regional team to represent North England. The last season has been fairly successful for Sarah, having only lost very few matches. Her local team got promoted into a higher local division and is still ambitioning a further promotion with her being the most successful player in the team and one of the most successful in the league. ...read more.

Middle

According to Cox (1998), self-efficacy is a situation specific self confidence. Additionally, Gill (2000) states that it is also the belief or the perception that one is competent and can do whatever is necessary in a specific situation to perform a task successfully. The following diagram according to Gill (2000) and Weinberg & Gould (1995) will illustrate Bandura's theory: ? ? ==> ? ? Performance accomplishments, according to Gill (2000) as well as Weinberg & Gould (1995), are based on mastery experiences and provide therefore the most dependable information on self-efficacy. Vicarious experiences, stated be Weinberg & Gould (1995) include modelling and imagery. Seeing demonstrations and watching somebody else successfully accomplishing the skill will increase self-efficacy (Gill, 2000). The effect will be enhanced when similarity between model and individual is greatest (Weinberg & Gould, 1995). Verbal persuasion will also influence the individual's behaviour and represents verbal encouragement from the coach or fellow athletes like "You can do it", "You have done it well", as well as positive self talk like "I can do it". Most influential on the performance will be a trustworthy and credible source (Weinberg & Gould, 1995). Along with Gill (2000), the role of the forth source of efficacy is less clear, but Bandura suggests that the perceptions of arousal, respectively the physiological states, positively affect the performance through efficacy expectations. ...read more.

Conclusion

A causal relationship can not always be established as further factors might have affect the findings. And a case study is producing a lot of data as well as being very time consuming. But according to Eysenck (2000), the case study is an inductive way suggesting a hypothesis/theory where no model or theory existed. This new theory can then be tested under more controlled conditions with more participants (Eysenck, 2000). Hence, using Bandura's self-efficacy theory to build up an injured athlete's confidence might have been helpful in this particular case, but in general it can not be said that this theory is will build up injured athletes' self-confidence when applied. Depending on further factors, the application of , e.g., Weiner's attribution theory or the Achievement goal theory could lead to a similar, respectively same result, i.e. building up the self-efficacy of an injured athlete. Reference List: COX, R.H. (1998) Sport Psychology - Concepts and applications. 4th ed. Boston. McGraw-Hill. EYSENCK, M.W. (2000) Psychology A student's handbook. East Sussex. Psychology Press. GILL, D.L. (2000) Psychological dynamics of sport and exercise. 2nd ed. Leeds. Human Kinetics. THOMAS, J.R. and NELSON, J.K. (2001) Research Methods in Physical Activity 4th ed. Leeds. Human Kinetics. WEINBERG, R.S. and GOULD, D. (1995) Foundations of Sport and Exercise Psychology. Leeds. Human Kinetics. 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Acquiring, Developing & Performance Skill section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Acquiring, Developing & Performance Skill essays

  1. Psychology for Sports Performance - task1 - How personality affects sports performance.

    This drive is caused by external or environmental motives. These motives are rewards, which may be tangible or intangible. Also the drive to perform well in sport may derive from a: Desire to please others e.g. praise from a coach.

  2. Self analysis of weaknesses in table tennis - Comparison to elite model 2

    Also as the ball is thrown up high it picks up more speed on the way down, so when it hits your bat face it means more spin will be created. A different way that could cause the weakness is that the rubber on my bat is either dead (no grip)

  1. Aim: to plan, perform, monitor and evaluate a 10-week training program for a specific ...

    Side Lunge 1. Stand upright, with both feet facing forward, double shoulder-width apart. 2. Place your hands on your hips, in order to keep your back straight, slowly exhale, taking your bodyweight across to one side. 3. Avoid leaning forward, or taking the knee of the bent leg over your toes.

  2. Psychology in Sport: Anxiety, Stress and Sports Performance

    athlete is at their peak before they begin, with their arousal or competitive anxiety levels within the 'Zone'. But what is the Zone of Optimal Functioning? Sports psychologist Hanin produced the individual zone of optimal functioning. He noticed that many top, elite performers and athletes have and "Individual zone of

  1. Free essay

    A2 PE Factors Affecting Performance - Anxiety / Arousal

    I can conclude this from my results. If the level of arousal rises too high the performance will decrease as stated Zuckerman (1991). Somatic anxiety cannot be controlled therefore I have to alter cognitive anxiety; Cox (1986) proved this also in the study on volleyball players. Some somatic anxiety is always good unless the player has very high cognitive anxiety levels.

  2. analysis of 2 sports : Badminton and Gaelic Football

    This gives us around 5 to 7 seconds of ATP production. 2) The Anaerobic Lactate (Glycolytic) System Once the CP stores are depleted the body resorts to stored glucose for ATP. The breakdown of glucose or glycogen in anaerobic conditions results in the production of lactate and hydrogen irons.

  1. Training Programme - I want to build up my stamina because I need it ...

    Feeling good and looking good will make our lives more enjoyable. There are four main components, which make up a healthy lifestyle; they are exercise, diet, hygiene, and rest. There are five different principles of training and they all help you become fit, safely: First one is called overload.

  2. Personal exercise plan

    structured accordingly in relation to prepare physiological changes so that it is used most efficiently at the right time, this is structured using periodisation. Periodisation The concept of periodisation is a method of dividing training in sections that have different aspects to give a more efficient competitive outcome.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work