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Training schedule - flexibility in martial arts

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Nicholas Marshall 10A 3/2/02 Physical fitness training or 'training' can improve many points of our body and improve health, which of course improves our daily lives. If we do not take care of ourselves our health and daily lives will suffer. It is from this position that it is imperative to do something about physical fitness training. This is where 'training' is used; it can improve us physically and as a result may improve us mentally, providing the circumstances allow it, thus having an overall good effect on our lives. To stay fit you must continuouly work to keep up your strength, stamina or whatever you are trying to improve- this needs either of these two things: 1. Immense willpower or... 2. ...to create a schedule, so as to become a daily part of your life, that concentrates on building up certain areas of your body as quick as possible. Now, a variable I can already spot that will apply to every training schedule is how well your body can adapt to the training. Adapting is the word used to define how fit or strong you will get in a certain amount of time; those who adapt slowly won't advance far while fast adapting people will. Adapting also depends on how hard you push yourself and how long you work for, this all has to be calculated into the schedule. My chosen topic for this project will be flexibility in martial arts, Teak-won-do in particular. I feel that flexibility plays a bigger part in our lives than any other training aspect: We already have enough strength to do everything we need in this modern world, unless you are a builder, speed is not of the essence, we have transport for that, but flexibility is needed. If all of us could touch our toes without a warm-up so many more things would be better in our normal every day lives. ...read more.

Middle

and the fat-free weight- the stuff that makes up the rest of our body's weight (organs, blood and other tissues). Bone and muscle are important parts of our body because the bone density decides how floatable you are (a high bone density means you will sink when swimming) and too much muscle tissue is a disadvantage in endurance events. The only time the sex difference changes anything is after puberty. Before it girls and boys have a similar body structure meaning sports between them will be very even until then. After puberty boys have a distinct advantage over the girls. After the ages of 20 or 30 peoples performance starts to decline. Our: * Bones become more brittle. * Joints stiffen and movement becomes painful (arthritis). * Muscles and tendons lose their elasticity * Reduction of cardiac output * Arteries lose elasticity * Slower recovery rate * Increased blood pressure * Decreased lung capacity * Decreased VO2 max * Increased body fat * Increased chance of disease. Your diet is another important factor of training. A good diet can help very much towards good fitness. A diet is made up 7 things. * Carbohydrates- can be either simple (are known as sugars or complex (are known as starches). They give us the energy needed for our muscles. Inside our body it is stored in small amounts, as glucose. When it is stored in greater amounts it is called glycogen. When training we need to make sure we have a good supply of glycogen beforehand. * Proteins- can be either non-essential amino acids (the 13 which the body can make itself) or essential acids (the remaining 8 which we get from food). We can get our proteins from fish and meat and their products. Protein provides material to build and repair cells and tissues. Excess protein is thrown away. * Fats- can be either unsaturated fats (e.g. ...read more.

Conclusion

The reason I did not do it is because I did not believe that it would show me much. Since the programme did not do very tiring exercises I would not get a very accurate result for either my heart rate or my recovery rate. In the end I decided that doing either tests would be pointless. I also did not include a pier sheet because there was little skill involved in doing stretching so I needed little advice. The last thing I did not take into account was my somatotype. The reason I did not do this is because I do not think that your somatotype affects your flexibility. Other than those points I think that the training programme was a success. The results prove that I did extremely well as they go up on every week and not down. I think the reason that the sit and reach test stayed at 17cm for the 5th and 6th was because I was reaching a point where I needed a lot more work to improve (I was plateauing). You can see that the results increased but they did not increase in a constant manner- they decreased over the weeks. This means that I either did not work out constantly or that my legs were starting to plateau and needed to work harder - I can not do any tests to figure this out exactly but from my own judgement I can safely say that the workouts I did in the first week were exactly the same as in my sixth week which means my legs must have been plateauing. Even though I got slightly bored with the exercises I do think that I managed to cover the aim: to stretch my legs. The warm up, stretches, and cool down all managed to stretch my legs without to much injury-, which is what a good programme is supposed to do. In the end though all my results, even through boredom, aches and plateauing, came to a successful finish, increasing all the way. ...read more.

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