• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

A region is a political tool.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

A Region is a Political Tool In the Concise Oxford Dictionary, the word 'region' has been defined as "an area of land, or division of the earth's surface, having definable boundaries or characteristics". It can therefore be said that a region may serve many different purposes for both human and physical processes. A region may be a naturally occurring phenomenon, such as a range of mountains or the course of a river, and hence be a distinct physical observation. However, a it may also be seen to be a human-devised locale, drawn out for the benefit of people in order to distinguish different sections of land. The most obvious examples of this type of region to us are the national borders of the countries of the world, whereby the particular nation states can govern and safeguard their populous within these written boundaries. Despite this, it is important to note that artificially imposed political parameters, such as national borders, are not the only boundaries put into place to define a region that incorporates human activity. This is because it is obvious that areas show their own social, cultural, and economic diversity. Such issues present us with an interesting argument as to the relevance of politics in declaring a region. The purpose of this essay is thus: to identify the extent to which politics is responsible for defining boundaries, and whether other forces are also successful in creating identifiable regions. One of the first questions we must ask as to the purpose of regions is why do we as human beings designate them in the first place? ...read more.

Middle

Europe is a region that is currently locked deep in a period of terrific economic, social and cultural transition. Political endeavours have been brought about that increase as well as aid this evolution. In this world of ever-increasing international relations, the European Community evolved into the European Union following the signing of the Maastricht Treaty in February 1992 in order to promote the freedom of people, money and goods throughout the continent of Europe. With this vision in mind, the EU regulates such practices as the production of crops and the movement of livestock throughout the region in an attempt to harmonise the nations' economies. It is a further example to illustrate the positive view that a region can be used as a political tool. Unfortunately, as with any idea it isn't always perfect. The BSE (commonly known as 'mad-cow disease') crisis that swept through the British Isles in the late 1990s led to a massive drop in sales of British meat across the EU region and subsequently all over the world. As the Union does not actually govern the nations that are a part of it, there was and still is a definite slump in the British farming industry. Until faith is one hundred percent fully restored (an occurrence, it might me added, that is highly unlikely) the national economy will undoubtedly continue to suffer. Nevertheless, as a region the overall success of the EU had since led to the landmark induction of the single European currency, the Euro (�). ...read more.

Conclusion

Some have claimed that these organisations reduce national boundaries to irrelevance within some spheres of trade, as taxation is no longer an obstacle. Globalisation is a process through which all aspects of modern human existence; cultures, commerce and civilisation, are entities no longer restricted to their places of origin. All this is true up to a certain point. It can be argued that all regions of human designation may be seen as political tools. Although formal opinionated parties may not be a symbol of them, personal identity - our want to speak out and proclaim our pride in who we are and where we come from - is clearly important to a significant number of us. This passion may therefore define the boundary of a cultural region just as clearly as any national border. As the territorially ruling factions in our world today, governments continue to hold a tight grip on the borders and boundaries around us. But it is the people who ultimately decide upon the common interest of who is who, what is what and what is where. It also appears that economics is the engine that drives politics today - it seems that no state can be totally self-sufficient and be prosperous. This may be one reason for the demise of Communism in Eastern Europe in the late 1980s and early 1990s. However, this itself has brought the idea around almost full circle: a region of individually governed countries working in political union for their own advantage. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level European Union section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level European Union essays

  1. A clear explanation of key underpinning economic theories relevant to the EU.

    Culture and arts are very important in every day Spanish life with many films being shot in Spain as of the beautiful buildings and surroundings. Greece, The official language of the country is Greek, Macedonian, Turkish, Albanian. The main religion is Roman Catholic and with many minor religions such as Islam and Judaism.

  2. Has Europe become a federal superstate?

    Moreover the principle of subsidiarity, as aforementioned, is still vital to the makeup of the EU, with the majority of domestically important decisions taken by nationally elected government rather than the EU. The existence of mutual recognition, whereby there is not one unified standard across the whole of the EU,

  1. Free essay

    Has British Politics been Europeanised

    The aspect of economic Europeanisation is the most obvious, visual and measurable of the three areas of discussion. Since Britain joined the EU, the British economy has become progressively intertwined with the economies of other member states of the Union.

  2. Transformation of the U.S. Hegemony in Europe through NATO after the Cold War

    Arm's length points out the fact that until Helsinki EU and NATO did not have to cooperate to any extent. Helsinki made it essential that these two institutions cooperate and coordinate. European Caucus is related with the EU's decision-making process.

  1. The question of whether Britain should gravitate toward adopting the euro is indeed an ...

    Although this may be the aim of the EU, economist Norman Lamont writes: increased trade in the euro zone has completely failed to translate into extra growth or jobs. The exchange of goods in itself is not the final objective of policy.

  2. Why did the witch-craze happen in Early Modern Europe?

    According to Ben-Yehuda, "It was to become the most influential and widely used handbook on witchcraft. ... Its enormous influence was practically guaranteed, owing not only to its authoritative appearance but also to its extremely wide distribution. It was one of the first books to be printed on the recently

  1. The Euro

    The General Council of the ECB was in charge for setting the conversion rate for the euro for each participating country. Those rates were established in January 1999, and are "irrevocably fixed." The conversion was based on the existing currency so that the euro is simply an expression of the previous national currency.

  2. Regulation 2560/2001 on cross-border payments in Europe.

    0,37 Euro 25,98 Euro Portugal 25,13 Euro 4,55 Euro 29,68 Euro Average 15,51 Euro 1,59 Euro 17,10 Euro For the European Commission, there were a number of important reasons to initiate this regulation. A starting point in their analysis was that the Euro was meant as mean to further integrate European national economies.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work