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"A written constitution, rather than gradual reform, is now essential for the UK to claim to be a modern democracy."

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Introduction

"A written constitution, rather than gradual reform, is now essential for the UK to claim to be a modern democracy." This essay will look at how a written constitution, according to some, would make Britain a modern democracy and it is therefore essential that the meaning of this phrase is fully understood before it can be explored in sufficient depth. A written constitution would outline the structures and powers of government in broad terms and the relationship between the different parts of government and citizens. Gradual reform, on the other hand, has no written record of the powers of government or a clear relationship between government and citizens; however, these are determined by laws that evolve with the current views and morals of Britain. A modern democracy can be interpreted differently by people and that is a fundamental reason for this conflict of interest. Some people, such as the Liberal Democrats, believe that the constitution would make Britain a 'modern democracy' because the basic principles of Britain would be defined and that there would be no loop holes in the law as to how the government can enforce new proposals. ...read more.

Middle

This is because a referendum could be made mandatory under the written constitution and this would satisfy the Liberal Democrats. The individual rights of citizens could be improved by making government less centralised, thereby making political factors such as taxation, local decision and policies more representative of people in a constituency. A constitution could enforce the empowerment of local government and regional assemblies, such as the Scottish Parliament and the Welsh Assembly, and this would make decentralisation mandatory. Lord Hailsham referred to centralisation as "an elective dictatorship" and this clearly portrays some opinion towards the state of our current system of gradual reform. The advantages of decentralisation are that specialisation in certain fields would allow local government to provide better education, healthcare and legal orders, such as the 'anti social order' that can be used in areas of high crime and were public nuisances are. Even on a national scale, decentralisation can occur by setting up specialist areas of government to deal with more complex issue, such as the protection of minorities. Therefore, not only would a written constitution provide equality and fairness in local areas, but it would also improve the efficiency of the government regarding its relation to special areas. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Scottish Parliament building is an example of how costs can sky rocket from their original predicted cost and also the length of time that is required to be extended. An estimated time to fully complete the constitution is ten years, by which time, societies needs will have changed. It would be unachievable for other reasons, such as the issue regarding who would write it. This would be unachievable because conflicts of interest would occur and therefore lengthy debates would delay the process and on some points such as immigration and tuition fees, no agreement could be made. The constitution would need to be flexible, yet definitive and therefore, in the opinion of some, because of the disagreement and mass debates, the constitution could not be flexible due to the fact that it would be difficult to amend and also that it could not possibly be definitive as it would have to be so vague that people reach a common opinion and understanding. Therefore, despite all the other reasons against the constitution, according to some, the written constitution is simply not possible due to the length of time it would require to be put in force and the disagreements that would prevent it from being definitive as a result of the broadness that would bring about any compromise. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 ...read more.

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