• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Analysis of Willie Stark's Life as a Politician.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Goodness and Badness: Analysis of Willie Stark's Life as a Politician Can it be right to do wrong? Can we have a square circle? Can we move backwards and forwards at the same time? During Plato's time (c. 429-347 B.C.) a long discussion had begun and carried throughout the Middle Ages that affirmed that the ruler ought to embody noble ideals and values. This tradition focuses on the virtues of justice and mercy as essential for good government. However, during the Renaissance period the author Niccolo Machiavelli turned away from these traditions and considers in The Prince what is necessary to be successful in a corrupt world. Machiavelli proclaims in his book The Prince, "A man who wishes to make a profession in everything must necessarily come to grief among so many who are not good. Therefore, it is necessary...to learn how not to be good, and to use this knowledge and not use it, according to the necessity of the case". Essentially, it is the situation at the moment that determines which actions are necessary. For Machiavelli, the goal is success, not the virtue or vice of the act. ...read more.

Middle

He exposed to the public the corrupt men of Harrison who coerced him to run for Governor only to be "used and abused in the process;" by blowing the whistle Willie became a bad man who turned against the people who helped him come into the political spot light. Instead of being seen with bad eyes, the public sympathized with him. With all the sympathy he gained Willie managed to win the race for Governor. Once Willie became Governor he became an opportunist because of the lack of support he received and because his power was growing. Willie essentially started off as a man who rose to power by offering to save the people from their distress, during his struggles, he became corrupted by power. Willie became corrupted because he realized that in order for him to help out the people he wanted to help out the most, he had to play a "little dirty". He was forced to bribe the state legislators in order to get his bills passed; he even went as far as blackmailing some in order to achieve his goals. Willie Stark exemplifies Machiavelli's discourse, "to learn ... not to be good ...and not use it, according to the necessity of the case". ...read more.

Conclusion

He was a human being who had dreams, a family he loved, and passions he yields to, among them a desire for power. The author, Warren shows Willie as a man torn between his visions of an ideal society and stark reality- what it takes in the real world to fulfill one's dreams. Willie sacrifices his ideals for action. He is a man of stark fact, and he wants results. In the end, Willie reevaluates his life's goals. But it is too late for change. Willie is not given a second chance. For Willie's political activity is much like Machiavelli political activity which is like a game of chess with its rules, its proven gambits, and its successful strategies. The master player knows how to exploit the weaknesses and blunders of his opponents to maximum advantage. The goal is finding the best move, the move that wins. The qualities needed to win may be judged as vices by others, but, as Machiavelli puts it in The Prince, they are "the vices by which you are able to rule." The crimes committed in order to preserve one's country are "glorious crimes." Willie essential would have believed, "a multitude is more easily governed by humanity and gentleness than by haughtiness and cruelty," the point is that a wise ruler does whatever is necessary. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Political Philosophy section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Political Philosophy essays

  1. Niccolo Machiavelli. Niccolo Machiavelli was born in Florence, Italy on May 3rd 1469. As ...

    After this trip he came to the conclusion that you have to be clever and ruthless if you want to create a state that has a strong force, he had to spend money and be cultured. In 1502 his third mission he met with Cesare Borgia and the massacre of

  2. So, whats wrong with Anarchism?

    Rousseau's explanations of the two different systems give a very clear image of how life would be for those who live without a state, where the strongest will survive or where the weak would gang up on the strongest and after defeating them they would fight amongst each-other.

  1. Power and Politics in Organizations: Public and Private Sector Comparisons

    wrest it from others (Berthoin Antal 1998; Dierkes 1988; Hardy and Clegg 1996: 631). One author (Kotter 1979: 2) noted that the open seeking of power is widely considered a sign of bad management. Indeed, the authors of management literature not only skirt the behavior associated with power struggles but

  2. An analysis of the Marxist perspective on religion

    There is no possibility for him to be able to improve himself or pursue his own interests, as he can only do what he is told to, like a machine. This detachment from the fruits of their labour, combined with the inequality, contributes to an increasing alienation, whereby the working

  1. Socialist uses of workers' inquiry

    In connection with the development of machinery and the growth of the productiveness of labor, has its intensity and duration increased or decreased? 78. Do you know of any cases of increases in wages as a result of improvements in production?

  2. The study of international or rather global politics, seeks to provide an account of ...

    2. The international system is anarchial. Because of the sovereign equality of all states, there is no central authority capable of controlling state behaviour (Baylis & Smith 2001:257). 4. The struggle for and use of power is at the core of international relations. As Robert Keohane explains (in Viotti & Kauppi 1993:192), "states seek power (both

  1. Piltdown man fake

    (I left the "evidence" part. We can work out how to organise this) The Evidence Piltdown man was considered to 500,000 years old. However scientific examination of the skeletal remains, the fossils and other artifacts found proved that these bones were less than 1000 years old.

  2. Russia's Political Party System as an Obstacle to Democratization

    Parties also had to surmount a 5 percent barrier in the party list voting to gain seats through that half of the election (Belin andOrttung 1997, 19). The results of the 1993 election were a disappointment for those who hoped for the emergence of a stronger party system.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work