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"Big" Industries.

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Introduction

"Big" Industries Many things that happened in history had a major impact on the world, especially when the development of big industries came about. Such things as Go-Getters, people credited for bringing the country together, and railroads, which interconnected things, all helped begin the Industrial Revolution. It was started mainly in Western Europe- England. One of the greatest things established was the Transcontinental Railroad in 1869, which made it easier to travel ocean to ocean from a month, to a week. The only problem was that there was no way to tell the exact time of departure and arrival. People counted on the sun, which was not most accurate. After a while, people relied on Philadelphia time, which still had its defaults. Shortly after, men were sent to go fix the problem, and in 1883, at noon, everyone set to Standard Time, (One of 4 time zones.) This made it easier for people who used the train as transportation, to know the exact times of departure and arrival. Another development involved in railroad transportation was the invention of, "Standard Gauge," created by George Stevenson. This was a gauge set at 4 feet, 8.5 inches, that showed how far apart rails had to be from each other. By 1869, the Transcontinental Railroad was completed in standard gauge. ...read more.

Middle

Soon after, he built his own pipeline, where he manufactured oil lamps, and sold it to the Chinese. The oil industry grew and exploded when automobiles were invented. Between the years of 1860 and 1910, 23 million people immigrated from Europe. In 1860, the government passed a law, making a 10-hour workday for every worker, but no one went around enforcing it. People usually worked 12 hours. In 1868, an 8-hour workday law was passed, but it only applied to government work. Usually people got paid in piecework, which was that they would get paid for the amount of products they made. This was favorable for young people. Later on, a man named Fredrick Taylor developed Efficiency Work. In 1881, he examined the factories and everyone's job, and put they into tasks. He put a time on each part of the task, which meant that they could not do as they pleased and everything was a on a time scale. There was also a product/craftsmen relationship. Workers were seen as machines. They worked in a strict environment. There was much noise, poor ventilation, and poor lighting. In 1882, there were up to 675 people killed a week. Woman also worked, but had poorer jobs, and poorer pay. They had simple task jobs, such as sewing. ...read more.

Conclusion

The strike spread throughout the country, so employers turned to the government and President Grover Cleveland for help. All laborers had to go back to work by the force of troops that had been sent. This started a trend so that whenever workers went on strike, owners could go to the federal government for help. A man named Thomas Edison, who started out in a city to improve technology for the stock ticker, received a bonus of 40,000 dollars, and left to open a business in New Jersey. He invented many things, but his favorite of them all was the Phonograph. He invented the light bulb with the help of Lewis Latimer, and hooked up New York City buildings to a power plant. By 1890, power plants were everywhere. He came up with a direct current, that went only 1 mile, but a man named Westinghouse had made a current that was alternating, and was a transformer. By 1898, there were 3,000 power stations powering over 2 million light bulbs. The affects that it had on daily lives were the birth of appliances, such as the refrigerator, and jobs were created. The development of the Industrial Revolution changed many things, and helped a good portion of them. Americans lives were made easier, and the good that it brought out is still used today. Great accomplishments will continue to occur, and make history such as the big explosion of the development of big industries. ...read more.

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