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Deontology- a theory based purely on obligation or duty.

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Introduction

Andria J. Williams Phil 022 10-28-03 Exam #2 Deontology- a theory based purely on obligation or duty It cannot be agreed upon that actions considered right are deemed as such solely because the corollary of that action is determined to be good. Consequentialism, a well-known theory of the right, suggests that the consequences of an action determine whether that action is considered as good or bad. However, the consequentialist theory does not leave room for special circumstances and ultimately leads to alienation. It is for this reason that deontology proves to be not necessarily right, yet one of the most compelling and interesting theories. Deontology is a theory of the right, which suggests that people have an obligation to behave in a specific way towards others. In other words, rules must be followed at all times. When broken down into the derivative words, the word "deontology", is compiled of the Greek word "deon", meaning duty. For instance, it is considered a moral duty not to kill, lie, or perform any other like tasks that violate moral written or unwritten laws, even if it produces a good consequence. This part of deontology protects the moral character of a person, thus refusing to impose on one's personal belief or morale. One such situation where this theory may become relevant can be found within the following scenario. A white female has been raped. ...read more.

Middle

His theories follow that of John Locke and capitalism. Within the theory of side constraints, it is suggested that a person's rights are side constraints. He strictly adheres to the concept that people should not be used as a means to an end, but only be used for ends that they themselves choose, thus further stressing the idea of personal rights. For instance, if a family owns an estate, which was justly acquired, no being should have the right to take this house or acquire anything of the inhabitants of the house, no matter what the circumstance. It would be wrong for anyone, government included, to take the possession of another under normal, unstressed situations. In everyday life, provided there are no complications, this theory proves to be a very credible one, due to the sense that every being has a need to feel secure with his or her own holdings. It gives an ultimate sense of pride and helps to encourage hard work and strivings fort the overall betterment of society as a whole, whereas, the opposite of side constraints, as described by Nozick, would be communism, a government in which nothing is truly owned by the people. Side constraints are necessary to an extent for a people to progress; however, too much of anything and the addition of a complicating matter could turn Nozick's theory of personal rights into a debate about an injustice and moral wrong. ...read more.

Conclusion

Deontology, as a theory of the right, would be sufficient in the perfect world; however, Earth is not and will never be considered as any type of utopia. The idea, which suggests that duties and obligations must be the foundations of all right physical and mental actions, does not always yield the best outcome. Deontology is in a sense a selfish theory, which promotes the strict following of rules and universal laws, while encouraging the private property of a person to be valued above overall well-being. This type of ranking can be used, in our not so perfect world, to promote moral wrongs. Ironically, these morally wrong actions are not considered as such by the deontologist, they are, in fact determined to be right. In knowing this deontology cannot be the best theory for determining what is right and wrong. Although this theory of the right deemed deontology seems to be geared toward the rights of the people, it ultimately will also be predisposed to harm and take away from the rights of the people. It holds strictly that all rules should be followed. This type of reasoning leads to the eradication of rights, which is depicted undoubtedly within the previous scenario dealing with the mass murders of innocent people. Being that the theory of the right, deontology allows a person to adhere to their personal moral rules and universal laws, yet also has the possibility to lead to the rights of others being destroyed unintentionally, makes deontology ultimately insufficient. ...read more.

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