• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Discuss how and why the New Right Conservative ideologies developed in the period from late 1970s through to the 1990s

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

A2 Governemnt and Politics Assignment No.2 Imran Miah 22/11/04 Discuss how and why the New Right Conservative ideologies developed in the period from late 1970s through to the 1990s The Conservatives have often been described as a part without ideology and their "lack of baggage" has ensured they kept up with the electorate throughout the 19th and 20th century. In early post 1945 period pragmatic and paternalistic ideas dominated conservatism throughout much of the western world. The remains of authoritarian conservatism collapsed with the overthrowing of the Portuguese and Spanish dictatorships in the 1970s.Just as conservatives had come to accept political democracy during the 19th century, after 1945 they came to embrace a Keynesian and welfarist form of social democracy. This tendency was confirmed by the rapid and sustained economic growth of the post war years, the" long boom" which appeared to bear out the success of "managed capitalism". During the 1970s however a set of radical ideas developed within conservatism directly challenging the Keynesian and welfarist orthodoxy. ...read more.

Middle

They also believe that individuals should be encouraged to be self reliant and to make rational choices in their own interests. The New Right was dominated by free market. They have also resurrected the classical economics of smith and Ricardo and presented it in the work of modern economists such as Fredrick Hayek. The reason that this may have been adopted was because between the 70s and onwards inflation was high. This was said to be because of the Keynesian economics that was pursued and had unknowingly fuelled inflation and generated stagflation of the 70s. Under Thatcher in the UK the levels of direct taxation was progressively near US levels, the highest rate of year's tax being reduced from 83p in the pound to 40p in the pound by 1988.New Right was also critical of the mixed economy that consisted of mixed state owned public sector and individual owned private sector, the New Right wished to reverse this trend. ...read more.

Conclusion

In conclusion the new right ideologies developed because of the so called permissive society which lacked ethical norms. It was seen as a 'pathless desert' that provides neither guidance nor support for individuals and their families. If individuals merely did as they pleased, civilised standards of behaviour will be impossible to maintain. For instance the trade union activity was regarded as dangerous because it could have led to unjustified acts. The New Right argues that there has been evident high delinquency and crime since 1960s and a decline in authority. So New Right stands for restoration of authority and a way of strengthening family values. The family however is understood strictly in traditional terms. They say that it is naturally hierarchal that kids listen to obey their parents that they say was in decline at this time. Furthermore New Right ideology was a reaction to the economic position of the country at the time and the only way to keep financial stability was through privatisation and through other economic tools such as supply side economics. (Research from: Andrew Heywood Political -Ideologies) ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Political Philosophy section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Political Philosophy essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    "Explain And Discuss How The "Ideologies Of Welfare" Explored In This Module Can Be ...

    3 star(s)

    and voluntary providers and institutions, in order to cut public spending (Leys, 1989, Pp 193-211). Mrs. Thatcher's parties' policies saw very different approaches to the former Labour party with key areas of policymaking. A key example of this is the move from Keynesian economic policy to Monetarist economic policy (Jones,1991, P145).

  2. Is the 'New Right' a departure from or a continuation of traditional British Conservatism?

    It is usually identified by language which stems from Disraeli and his references to "One Nation" from his novel Sybil in 1845. It is highly debatable as to whether this is indeed the most traditional form of Conservatism because it did, after all, contain some facets which differed from the eras of Edmund Burke and Robert Peel.

  1. How far did Conservative governments conform to traditional conservatism between 1945 and 1990?

    This cooperation can be seen as trying to create Order, but at the same time this could also be seen as an example of socialism. This ultimately led to Thatcher's governments of the 1980s, who were committed to reducing the power of the trades unions but, unlike the previous Heath

  2. 'Accidental Death Of An Anarchist' was written by Dario Fo, in 1970 - Contextualisation

    jokes, optical illusions, physical movement and the like. In 'Accidental Death Of An Anarchist', the Maniac is the chief device of farce, satire and even slapstick. Fo created Maniac from the template of the 'Jongleur' (originating from classical traditions.) This character would hide behind farcical, "mask of a fool and proceed to make scathing, satirical attacks on authority figures with the mask as his protection".

  1. To what extent did the key political ideas directly Influence change and development in ...

    had been keeping extremely low reserves of foreign currency and her Balance of Payments was in drastic deficit. However, the Nazis employed Schacht to control the economy, he was a supremely efficient economist and by clever manipulation managed to produce impressive and more than stable results.

  2. Political Ideologies

    stability but is aware that power can corrupt - limited government is therefore favoured * Want a codified or written constitution to protect rights John Locke (1632-1704) * Focused on the need for natural rights - life liberty and property * End of absolutist rule replaced by constitutional monarchy was

  1. "At the heart of New Right thought, lies the paradox of libertarian and authoritarian ...

    from government intervention, and so they allowed for unemployment to rise to extremely high levels.

  2. Europe post WW1

    Therefore the Peace Treaties didn't solve anything, just increased the resentment toward democracy in some countries, which was also one of the reasons why democracy failed.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work