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Discuss the conflicts between Employee and Employer by Marxist

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Introduction

Discuss the conflicts between Employee and Employer by Marxist Crystal Xu Table of Content Page 1. Introduction 1.1 Overview on the essay topic ..............................2 1.2 Structure of this essay ...............................2 2. About Marxism 2.1 Overview on Marxism ..............................3 3. Conflict between Employer and Employees 3.1 In Management Studies ...............................4 3.2 In Marxism ...............................4 3.2.1 Labour Power ...............................4 3.2.2 Capitalism Power ...............................5 3.2.3 Source of the Conflict between Employee and Employer .......................6 3.2.3.1 Employers ...............................6 3.2.3.2 Employees ...............................7 4. Conclusion .............................10 Bibliography ..............................12 1. Introduction 1.1 Overview on the essay topic To organisations, employees (labours) are wonderful resources, because they are compact and multi-purpose, capable of simple manual tasks or dealing with complicated machines, most importantly, they are the profit maker for their employers. However, there is always a problem between employees and employer- 'Any attempt to manager in a humane way, by consensus, is doomed to failure because of the irresolvable conflict between employees and their employers.' Within nearly every organisation or company conflicts occur from time to time, between the employers and the employees. This paper argues what kind of conflicts between employee and employer from the perspective of Marxism and Labour Theory. 1.2 Structure of this essay The main purpose of this essay is to define the conflict between employees and employers is irresolvable. Firstly, I will briefly introduce Marxism and the Marxism Economy. Secondly, I will explain some of the Marx's issue on Labour Power and Capitalism Power, this will lead to the next section- the conflict relationship between them in an organisation. Thirdly, in this section I will describe the sources of conflict in an organisation, and discuss why the conflict between them is irresolvable. ...read more.

Middle

Hence, some forms of production are needed for survival. The suggestion being that it is acceptable for oneself but not for others because some individuals may have all factors of production (capital, entrepreneurship, labour and land), while others may have nothing but just their own labour, which eventually will result in uneven distribution of wealth and income. Additionally, Marx argued that capitalism deprives the labour force of their 'creative fulfilment', and since they are portrayed to be the already planned part of the production process, they are unable to achieve self-actualisation. 3.2.3 Source of the Conflict between Employee and Employer 3.2.3.1 Employers As Marx observed, a class conflict was sometime coming to a head within the capitalist order, which is the conflict between capitalists and exploited wage-workers. If we want to talk about the conflict is caused by employers, this will come down to a very important theory in Marxism - Surplus Value. As someone defined the surplus values as: 'The surplus produced over and above what is required to survive, which is translated into profit in capitalism. Since the capitalist pays a labourer for his/her labour, the capitalist claims to own the means of production, the worker's labour-power, and even the product that is thus produced.' 8 Marx also poses the problem this way (Capital Vol. 1) 'Workers are exploited under capitalism.'9 Workers as employees in an organisation, they are working for their employer, and their employer has the power to either use or dismiss its employees in the organisation. Also, from Marx's point of view, 'The bosses are always out to get that little bit more out of the workers. ...read more.

Conclusion

In the final section, I overview the whole essay, and discuss the why the conflict between employer and employee is inevitable, in addition I illustrate the answer with some of my opinions at the end. Most of people believe that employers are always trying to maximise their profit all the time, and they are try to make more profit by forcing their employees to work longer hours. From a different point of view, Campbell (1981:75) argued that 'It is often argued by orthodox economists and others that the motivation and goals of firms is no longer to attempt to maximised profits'. Now they see 'all of their employees, consumers, managers and society as a whole.' Employers now are gradually increasing their employers' wages, and providing them with pensions, and other benefits too. However, the reason that employers can provide their employees higher wages and more benefits, because they are still making extra profit by getting surplus value from their employees in a different way. Therefore, employer wants to make more profit by getting their employees works more, employees want to be paid more and get as more benefits as possible from their employer. From my point of view, conflict is a process that begins when one party observes that another party has negatively affected, or is about to negatively affects something the first party cares about. Conflict is inevitable because people will always have different viewpoints, ideas, and opinions. Also, as Marx said, 'The only goals that political economy sets in motion are greed and the war amongst the greedy' (cited by Campbell, 1981:21). To conclude, if employer wants to make profit in an organisation, it is impossible to manage its employees in a humane way, so the conflict between employers and employees is always irresolvable. ...read more.

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