• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Evaluate the different interpretations of the role of the state

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Evaluate the different interpretations of the role of the state There are many different views about what the role of the state is and should be. All mainstream parties have concluded that there is some need for welfare provisions in a modern day liberal democracy. However with historical variations to each ideology it is sometime difficult to group an ideology as one. Also many variations agree with other ideological variations. The role of the state is a controversial issue with many differing ideas. Traditional conservatism stresses the importance of a strong state in order to maintain and uphold society. Authority and tradition are embedded in the state and act as the state to hold it together. Although Burke is a strong advocator of this view it is clear that from such a role the state could become a totalitarian state, especially with Conservatives believing that being born into society simply means you must follow its rule. A criticism of this view would be found in classical liberal ideology, with theorists such as Locke and Hobbs that would argue that by having a strong state individual freedoms were being eroded away. ...read more.

Middle

Green and Hohouse call for a need for a welfare state to free those who are exploited through industrialisation. It answers the criticism of Classical liberalism, that doesn't provide any safe guard against social inequality, by providing a welfare state. It also avoids the possibility of unrest and revolution from the lower orders. Anarchists would argue that no state is required and put trust in the good nature of humans in running a society. I agree to some extent with Paine (classical liberal) that the state is a 'necessary evil' but I see the state as more of a safety net, there to protect when needed. Modern liberals believe that a welfare state answers the question of removing social inequalities, where as Marxists believe that removing the state initially is the answer. By radically redistributing wealth among society and eventually dissolving the state, it aims to eradicate an unfair class system, as it sees itself. However in order to achieve this stateless state, a strong state is required in order to implement it! ...read more.

Conclusion

In conclusion there is a clear consensus that a welfare state has its merits in a liberal democracy. It is the modern liberal approach, that both one-nation conservatism and social democrats have been influenced by, that protects its citizens whilst still allowing them individual freedoms. Although there is a clear argument that by imposing a welfare state individual freedoms are eroded but this is a small price to pay in order to protect against rebellion and unrest. But as Hobhouse and Green would highlight, a welfare state s needed to protect the individual freedoms that are eroded away through free capitalist societies. Although social democrats have a strength to their argument for a full remake of the economy and the framework of society I believe this goes too far. To remove the class system, would be to remove tradition and that is not necessary in order to protect individual freedoms, it could even go some way to eroding them further. A welfare state that doesn't seek to become a 'nanny' state such as one-nation conservatism, but one that puts protection of individual freedoms at the forefront of its ideas would be a desirable way to run a state. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Political Philosophy section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Political Philosophy essays

  1. Breaking down the Walls: A Discourse of Ideology and "Otherness"

    Personally, there was a specific incident that allowed me to see that race ideology was a cultural construction. At the age of 20, only two years ago, I sat with my family and spent the night watching the stand up performances of Richard Pryor, Eddie Murphy, and Chris Roc.

  2. Politics A: Analysing Theories of the State and Individual - Hobbes and Locke

    This right to life was un-negotiable which meant it could not be sold to anyone or ended by anyone. Human beings had a right to the products of their own labour. When a person worked they mixed their labour with raw materials, which therefore became their property.

  1. Why did the New Liberals attach so much importance to the reform of social ...

    While this seemed plausible in the 1850s or 60s it was not credible come the 1880s. The 'New' Liberals, ideas were born out of this realisation that market forces on their own were not enough or at best they were too slow.

  2. Should the state play more or less of a role in deciding what is ...

    "The family is the building block of society. Its a nursery, a school, a hospital, a leisure place, a place of refuge and a place of society" (Margaret Thatcher1998). When Thatcher was in control she withdrew benefits from 16-18 year olds, who did not take up a place on a

  1. Assess what should be the role of the state

    This problem is merely exacerbated by the need for a terroristic police force, monopoly on communications and a monopoly of weapons1. It is difficult to understand how anyone could feasibly suggest that, with the possible exception of safer streets, these aspects of state rule might be beneficial to the everyday life of citizens.

  2. What are the main ideological principles of the conservatives, Labour and Liberal democrats? To ...

    In a society that is changing people felt that the Conservative traditional views did not suit their personal beliefs and even upper and middle class people swung towards Labour. This shows the class party link is declining and policy is becoming more significant.

  1. Utilitarianism: Explanation And Study of Criticisms

    Is long term or short term pleasure more valuable? For example, when deciding whether to take an ecstasy tablet at a club. Taking the pill may give you a lot of short-term pleasure, but in the long term, it may cause more harm than good. Not taking the tablet would involve fewer risks and would avoid potential pain.

  2. How and why does Locke explain the creation, value and protection of property?

    The legislative body which is entrusted with the people to making laws must pass nothing contrary to the law of nature even though people might consent to such enactments or it will cease to be legitimate. Locke therefore faces the problem of trying to justify action such as taxation that

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work