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Explain which groups in German society supported the National Socialists 1928-1932 and give reasons for this support of the Hitler Movement

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Introduction

Explain which groups in German society supported the National Socialists 1928-1932 and give reasons for this support of the Hitler Movement Before 1928 the Nazi Party had been essentially an urban party. Its support was drawn from small craftsmen such as potters, as well as young ex-soldiers; although there were encouraging signs that the party was doing well among the farming community. The National Socialists only picked up 7.5% of the vote in the Landtag elections of May 1928 and only had a membership of 108,000. As a result they gradually decided to shift their efforts towards winning the rural vote. By the end of 1929 party membership had nearly doubled to 176,00, and the party received a very encouraging result in the Thuringia Landtag election, scoring just over 11% of the vote. For the first time, a Nazi became a Regional Minister. From being a fringe party that had no real political importance, the Nazis had reached a position whereby they had to be taken more seriously, both by the population and the opposing political parties. ...read more.

Middle

Such visual imagery appealed to the agricultural workers, farmers and industrial workers alike, and helped to build an image of the Nazi party succeeding in creating a strong and united fatherland. Between 1924-1930 men were more likely to vote for the Nazi party then women. However by 1932 women voting habits changed significantly equalising those votes by men, indeed in predominantly Protestant areas significantly more women than men voted in favour. By the spring of 1932 membership of the party had reached 1 million. It was a great achievement for any political party in such a short space of time of just 4 years. There were several elections throughout 1932, two for presidency in the spring, regional elections and two elections for the Reichstag. In the presidential elections Hitler challenged Hindenburg for the presidency. Old field Marshal won but only with the support of the SPD and the centre party, which Hitler resented. ...read more.

Conclusion

However like the 'new middle class' their voting was crisis-related. Another historian Falter also agrees with Childers on these matters. Falter confirmed Childers; thesis about relatively low proportion of white-collar workers among the Nazi electorate. Falter also confirms Childers point on the pensioners and widows voter by demonstrating that there is a slight correlation between a high Nazi vote and districts where there was a higher that average number of pensioners and visa versa. Therefore many pensioners were prepared to vote for the party, if not to become members to it. Between 1928 and 1932 the changing policies of the Nazi movement helped ensure mass appeal and support from a broad spectrum of society, covering a wide range of socio-economic groups. The significant shift encompassed elements from both the working and middle classes, ranging from farmers, small businessmen to the civil servants and white-collar workers; all of who, were striving for prosperity for themselves and the ideal of building a 'fatherland.' Rachael Daniels ...read more.

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