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General Election Process In The Uk

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´╗┐General Election In the UK we are lucky to have what is called a democracy. This is when we allow people to give their opinion in the form of voting. This lets the people of the UK have a say in how the country is run - after all they do live there. General Elections give the people who vote a chance to vote for a new representative for their area. The country is divided into areas called constituencies and the person who wins the vote in his or her constituency will become a member of parliament or MP. Here are the phases of how the General Election works. Dissolvement of parliament https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/r2w3ZauSodv5ygU5RCEbbOPYC2_hC-74lV0nP58n-3-Sa2HZcvG4YLwvnBir0JZ5fal4jlTnPnV96-9e8jxZZ_zLLgygojEyaV-f8gxlkoCiwfbegB3DDlhwQ72snvlVmg The current prime minister makes the formal announcement that soon it will be time to vote for a new party. He asks the Queen to dissolve (suspend) parliament and sets the date for the Election Day. Six days later parliament is dissolved. This mean all the current MP?s that won last time lose their jobs and have to campaign to get reelected. ...read more.


Handouts - leaflets and flyers are a cheap and easy way to get people to look at some information about your party. Newspapers - putting your party in the paper will most likely reach an audience that are willing to read about what you stand for. This is better than the handouts as handouts may be thrown away or might not be read or understood as much. On the other hand newspaper advertisements are quite expensive to buy. Social Networking - Running your ads on Facebook or Twitter will reach a lot of people as they are always getting a lot of traffic to those websites and these will have more chance to reach people. This just gets the word out to people, help them get interested in who you are, what you stand for and what you can bring to the table. Voting Process People vote for the MP candidate and the party they belong too. Each party has its own election manifesto which is a list of things they promise to do if it gets into power. ...read more.


Firstly they are separated into different sets of piles. Spoilts votes - Votes in which do not fit they way that was suggested. E.g if you put two crosses or if you scribbled one and crossed another. Spoilt votes do not get counted but they also don?t get thrown away. One reason for this is there might be some countable votes that were misplaced Countable votes - Votes that fit the guidelines. (One clear cross in the box provided thats next to candidate) Then all the countable vote are given out to counters. They are counted by hand and not computer. This is to make sure that there is little compromise to the counting process due to how easily the computers could be hacked or tampered with. Once they votes are counted and verified the winner is selected. The winning party is the party with the most MP?s. This party will go on the lead the county for the next 4 years when this process is repeated. State Opening of Parliament - This is when all the votes have been counted. Now the new prime minister will be selected. Now we need to reopen the government. The Queen holds an event which has special meaning. ...read more.

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