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George Washington: America's Greatest Leader

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Introduction

George Washington: America's Greatest Leader An independent country requires a strong, wise and dignified administration to guide a highly emotional population through a tough phase while establishing a stable relationship with other nations. At the same time, the first president, guided by his administration, must create a charter to govern the nation. Being the first president of the United States of America and a new face on the world stage, George Washington along with his administration created an excellent blueprint for the recently formed nation. Washington was successful as the first president because his administration maintained peace and neutrality in European affairs, consisted of men from all factions in administrative departments, and created the concept of a three-branch government. Washington had organized a government in 1789 that no American had ever seen before.1 Being the first president, he had to set high standards to unify his nation. Washington knew that unity would come when he acknowledged one fact, "The states had once been wards of England, and they wanted no more of it."2 Rather than aiming at England directly and solely, Washington broadened his target to the society of Europe. ...read more.

Middle

When it came to governing, the non-partisan President Washington made sure no one party would persuade him completely. He would have to look at issues through the eyes of everyone. Determined to build a real federal government, Washington assembled a cabinet of contrasting men in attitude, experience and background. Washington hoped to prevent divisive partisanship and sectionalism by appointing the most talented people available to his cabinet.7 In making his decision, Washington acted fairly without favouritism.8 A few of the appointed cabinet members were Edmund Randolph to attorney general, Thomas Jefferson to secretary of state, and Alexander Hamilton to the secretary of the treasury. Now, Washington had a diverse cabinet with various men from all factions in administrative departments. Two of the most contrasting cabinet members that Washington had were Jefferson and Hamilton. Each opposed the others ideology, and wanted Washington siding with them. Compromises between the two were almost nonnegotiable. Both Jefferson and Hamilton fell into specific parties and both embodied the point of view of each party. Hamilton was strictly Federalist where Jefferson was firmly Democratic Republican. Being non-partisan, this was not what Washington had in mind; however the differences between Hamilton and Jefferson were beneficial to Washington. ...read more.

Conclusion

Basically, it is harder to get a majority vote to pass laws and with the checks and balances, the executive branch can overrule majority votes. Over Washington's eight years as first president of the United States, not many can argue that he played an insignificant role. Even today, Washington's magnificent work is recognized and appreciated. He is admired by a large number of historians and talked very highly of by teachers. There is no doubt that President George Washington along with his administration created an excellent blueprint to govern such a young country, a country to be proud of. 1 "Washington as President." Britannica Intermediate Encyclopedia. 17 Mar. 2003 <http://library.bigchalk.ca/cgi-bin/WebObjects/WOPrimo.woa/24/wa/getDoc?docid=71053640&product=CanadaLib> 2 "Washington as President." Britannica Intermediate Encyclopedia. 17 Mar. 2003 <http://library.bigchalk.ca/cgi-bin/WebObjects/WOPrimo.woa/24/wa/getDoc?docid=71053640&product=CanadaLib> 3 "Peace and Neutrality in European Affairs." Britannica Intermediate Encyclopedia. 17 Mar. 2003 <http://library.bigchalk.ca/cgi-bin/WebObjects/WOPrimo.woa/24/wa/getDoc?docid=71053640&product=CanadaLib> 4 "Peace and Neutrality in European Affairs." Britannica Intermediate Encyclopedia. 17 Mar. 2003 <http://library.bigchalk.ca/cgi-bin/WebObjects/WOPrimo.woa/24/wa/getDoc?docid=71053640&product=CanadaLib> 5 George Washington. Washington's Farewell Address. September 17th, 1796. 6 "Peace and Neutrality in European Affairs." Britannica Intermediate Encyclopedia. 17 Mar. 2003 <http://library.bigchalk.ca/cgi-bin/WebObjects/WOPrimo.woa/24/wa/getDoc?docid=71053640&product=CanadaLib> 7 John Alden et al. George Washington: A Biography. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1984. 8 "Washington as President." Britannica Intermediate Encyclopedia. 17 Mar. 2003 <http://http://library.bigchalk.ca/cgi-bin/WebObjects/WOPrimo.woa/24/wa/getDoc?docid=71053640&product=CanadaLib 9 John Alden et al. George Washington: A Biography. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1984 10 taken from the US Constitution 1 ...read more.

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