• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How democratic was Britain by 1918

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How democratic was Britain by 1918? Kirsty Adams A country is democratic only when all of their citizens have access to the political process and their voting system is fair. Also, it is democratic when the government is accountable to the voters and voters have the right of choice in elections. Democracy is a government of the people, by the people, for the people. This included: fairness, accountability, choice, access to information, party organisation, the right to vote and the opportunity to become an MP. The political system round about the 1850's was full of corruption and unfairness. Elections were ran by bribery because MP's used to pay voters off and because voting was just a matter of raising your hand candidates would be able to see who voted for them or not. The political system favoured the wealthy in many ways: there was a requirement that no man could stand for election unless he owned land worth �610. ...read more.

Middle

This meant well over 100 new voters. This act also contributed to the major redistribution of seats. 35 boroughs lost both their MP's and 17 lost 1 MP. Many boroughs then merged together into counties and Scotland gained 7 MP's. Many new counties and cities gained an MP. The 1884 Reform Act gave working class people in the countryside the vote (this was very ineffective because of industrialisation and most people were moving towards the town) but still not all men had the vote and no women had the right to vote yet. But by 1918 women over 30 and men over 21 had the right to vote. Access to information plays a demanding role in how democratic Britain was becoming. One of the reasons that working class people could not get a say in the running of the country was down to literacy. As time progressed people were more able to understand what was going on through the growth of newspapers and libraries. ...read more.

Conclusion

In conclusion, although the political system was fairer due to the ballot act and the redistribution of seats act still people did not have the vote, especially women under 30. Also there were still very few working class candidates. The House of Commons was becoming more powerful than the Lords which meant a peoples government. People now had choice on who to vote for as corruption was diminished. Also, as access to information was more available it was easier to see which party they wanted to vote for. In general party organisation was improved through things like branch associations etc. The chance to become an Mp was much easier for other classes. Britain was on its way to becoming democratic although more would have had to be done to ensure fairness and choice so the public would have a government of the people, by the people, for the people. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Political Philosophy section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Political Philosophy essays

  1. How Democratic is Britain?

    The problem with this is that most of the people who work for the state are middle and upper class and all seem to share the same views about the way society should be run. This means that not all views are being represented their views are elitism.

  2. Is consociational democracy democratic?

    Moreover, the form segmental autonomy takes in the Netherlands is that pillar organisations in areas such as education, health care and housing are recognised and financed by the government. Each organisation has considerable influence in the running of their policy sector, but the increasing intervention of the state in imposing

  1. Communism VS Democracy

    British democracy has a system of balanced rights and divided authority. A British government must consider the views of many individuals and organized bodies before it can act. Parliament seems to rule, but it is actually the people who rule through Parliament.

  2. Stages to Germany from 1918 to 1919

    The second stage in the process was that Germany became a republic. In October 1918 a new government based on the Reichstag was formed. This was 'a revolution from above'. The new republic government was led under Prince Max of Baden.

  1. T difficult for export orientated economics to sustain the land owning elites much longer. ...

    (Lamounier, 1999, p 131 - 189) By the time the new constitution was in place Argentina had been developing a lucrative export economics strategy for twenty years, externally, the demand for Argentinean products to satisfy European 'industrialization and urbanisation' (Waisman, 1999, p77)

  2. Russia's Political Party System as an Obstacle to Democratization

    The collapse of the Soviet Union fueled a growing conflict between Yeltsin and parliament over which formulas to apply to the new political system, the issue being which institution should dominate. The ill-defined constitution essentially grafted a constitutionally weak presidential executive onto what had been a parliamentary system, giving neither

  1. The Parliamentary Reform and Redistribution Act of 1884 - 1885.

    adult male householders and �10 lodgers the right to vote Also added about six million to the total number who could vote in parliamentary elections Source-http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/PR1884.htm This source is supported by: The act extended the 1867 concessions from the boroughs to the countryside.

  2. How democratic was Britain by 1918?

    The number has remained for 135 years. This is significant because it was the establishment of the House of Commons. The number of constituencies grew significantly. In 1865 there were 401 constituencies, by 1874 it had risen to 416. Not just the rise of constituencies was important; by 1880 the number had remained the same.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work