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How far do the policies of the PLO between the founding movement in 1964, and the signing of the Israeli PLO Accord in 1993?

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Introduction

How far do the policies of the PLO between the founding movement in 1964, and the signing of the Israeli PLO Accord in 1993? The PLO was committed to the use of armed force and the complete destruction of Israel. However by the late 1980's Arafat had moved away from the use of violence and excepted the existence of Israel. There are three areas in which the PLO policies changed terror, the UNO and the state of Israel. First the National Charter, 1964 'Armed struggle is the only way to liberate Palestine'. This suggests that the Palestinians only believe in the use of terror in order to succeed in destroying Israeli power. Violence continued at the Olympic Games in 1972, a PLO group called Black September was responsible for the deaths of 11 Israeli athletes. Hijacking of planes in 1976 saw a splinter group taking over a French plane, holding over 100 Jewish passengers as hostages. ...read more.

Middle

However in 1974 Arafat addressed the UNO which contradicts their total rejection and shows how times are changing throughout the years. 'Ok world. We'll play the game by your rules. We'll make you care!' This shows that there is no justifying peace and that Arafat wants to go his own ways, which certainly links to terror. Again by 1988 Arafat was centred on whether to accept American demands mainly the idea behind the UN Resolution 242 which states that there could be an exchange of land in return for peace. This shows that the PLO are ready to accept the UNO as a legitimate peacekeeping organisation and therefore accepted the existence of the Jewish State of Israel. The policies have changed greatly but there is evidence, which suggests that in practise they stay similar, the same situation for my argument on terror. Another example is the Gulf War and that USA organised a coalition army to throw the Iraqis out of Kuwait. ...read more.

Conclusion

The over simplicity to pin point the policy given the desperate nature still proves in my opinion to be difficult to establish. All in all I conclude that the National Charter in 1964/8 changed dramatically on paper as shown by the signing of the PLO Accord in 1993. However the extreme movement of groups such as the Intifada and Hamas and Arafat on the Gulf War, proved to be an important factor in showing how closely related the policies were and how far they changed. This could be on paper or in practise and therefore I think Arafat has a different opinion on a lasting peace settlement in public than to appear as a traitor to the Palestinians. My final judgement is that there seems to be a clear change in theory but in practise there is this continuity of violence and terror which outlooks the PLO's view of peace. This makes you wonder if there is a balance of reason or just a smokescreen towards the Palestinians aims and beliefs. 1 1 Chris Warnes 11B 1 1 ...read more.

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