• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Karl Marx and Communism.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Eva Rich English 101 October 10, 2003 Karl Marx and Communism Karl Marx, a philosopher in the mid 1800s, is known for his theories of socialism. According to Marx, an ideal economic system would involve exchanges of equal value for equal value, where value is determined simply be the amount of work put into whatever is being produced. He says Capitalism interrupts this ideal because it involves profit. People are driven to work harder and be better at what they do for profit. This profit allows for ownership of property which in turn is a mark of power. Power, property, and wealth create a division of labor and a separation of classes. ...read more.

Middle

Marx believed labor was bad, he said it alienated people from the world. A society that does not use wealth as power can balance the independence of individuals who have great wealth against the independence of those people who are poor. The rich cannot use their wealth as capital, to earn profits. A rich person cannot use his wealth to own property or lend for interest that would be wrong because it is capitalism. Marx believed the rich should be free to use their wealth otherwise, and should use it in service to the poor. Marx believed people in this society would take pleasure in serving each other and doing things to help each other. ...read more.

Conclusion

Thus, man is freed from the slavery of capitalism. Communism is an ideal economic program that our world is not ready to live by, our world is far too selfish and many are too lazy, communism has failed every time simply because of these reasons. Communism also goes against human nature. Karl Marx was not a bad person for his philosophy about an ideal economic system. Marx is a misunderstood visionary philosopher. Communism is not a terrible thing to be avoided like the plague. He has great ideas that if followed would end many problems our society faces. His philosophies are possible if people treated others with respect and equality, not selfish, and are hard workers. Communist supporters believe Marx's ideas to be great and view him as a prophet unfortunately his visions of the perfect society would only work in a perfect, ideal world. Rich 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Political Philosophy section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Political Philosophy essays

  1. A Comparison of Marx's and Rousseau's Philosophies.

    According to him, religion originates from fear, in their powerlessness before nature and later before their exploiters and forces of capitalism. So Marx believed that atheism alone is rational. On the other hand, Rousseau proposed Deism in place of atheism, if not for speculative reasons, at least as a support

  2. What did Karl Marx mean by 'exploitation' in a capitalist economic system?

    Consequently Marx concluded that surplus value is the source of capitalist profit. In other words, the capitalist grabs the surplus value, which should belong to the workers as his own profit: it is the exploitation. Exploitation of labour in today's capitalist system still exists on a large basis.

  1. How and why does Locke explain the creation, value and protection of property?

    In order to justify the existing structure of the economy where many individuals clearly hold more than is needed to simply ensure their own survival. In order to justify the economy surviving in the current state in a manner that is consistent with the natural law, Locke devises a series

  2. How did Marx conceive the transition from capitalism to communism?

    tendency towards monopolization would certainly arise and with it more people ranking in the proletariat and fewer in capital. The political aspect of the transition is perhaps the most important as it clearly conceives how the transition would actually take place.

  1. Discuss the advantages of Communism over other political theories like Capitalism.

    This time they had more in common. Engels had rejected the Young Hegelians and other "radical bourgeois" acquaintances. Marx had moved rapidly into communism. They had reached a common point. Marx had introduced Engels to the editors of a new radical journal in Paris called Vorwarts which after a vague beginning had become an organ of revolutionary and communist propaganda.

  2. Assess the merits and limitations of the ideas of Karl Marx

    However, voting rights and the formation of trade unions have given the working class more power and influence in society than when Marx was writing, enabling workers to demand fair pay and working conditions. In spite of this there is still much evidence of opposing class interests and class conflict, such as strikes and industrial sabotage in the workplace.

  1. Socialist uses of workers' inquiry

    In other words, we need to investigate the manner in which the system of values expressed by the workers in normal circumstances changes, and detect those values that are substituted or disappear when the awareness of alternatives arises, because some of the values held by workers under normal circumstances are absent from moments of class conflict and vice versa.

  2. How does Karl Marx account for the 'industrialisation' of society?

    Moreover these relations of production constitute the economic structure; which is the foundation of society which legal and political superstructures are formed on. Due to this Marx states that the mode of production in the material life determines society. In other words, it is not the ideas or indeed values

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work