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Morality! The theory of ethical egoism

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Introduction

MORALITY! 'THE THEORY OF ETHICAL EGOISM'. This suggests that the goal of each person's life should be of his or her self-interest. Afterall, it is long-term happiness that is important, so you should be able to behave in such a way that you benefit in the long run. Everybody should apply this theory, as everyone should maximise his or her own happiness. ...read more.

Middle

The action with the greatest amount of happiness is the best one. 'THE DISCOVERED OR INVENTED ARGUMENT'. This is for those who believe that there is an absolute good way to live. The religious society may call it as 'living in accordance to god's will'. This means finding the correct principles in which one should live and then decide how to apply these principles. ...read more.

Conclusion

For those who believe in God, this is fine because we have a soul and the essence of free will. For atheists this is problematic. Atheists believe that the world works according to physical laws that are deterministic.... in other words, free will should not exist. Some philosophers such as zeno have said that we react to the world in a predetermined way, but we THINK that we are free; this means that we can never be held responsible for our actions, since they are not really free. ...read more.

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