• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Outline the teachings of Marx and state whether you think Marxism has any relevance in the 21st century.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Shai Manor 09/11/03 History IB HL 11 A Outline the teachings of Marx and state whether you think Marxism has any relevance in the 21st century. 750-1000 words Marx summarized his ideas into four steps, which he believed already occurred, were occurring, or were going to occur in the future. He saw history as a struggle and conflict between the have, and have-nots. The rulers had land, food and goods, while the other lower classes had almost nothing. The haves had exploited the have-nots and so he believed they would revolt against the rulers. The rulers were making the lower classes work hard, and give them almost nothing for their hard work. He believed the lower classes would defeat the ruling ones, and then they would all co-operate for the good of each other. There would not be any governments and specific rulers, every person would be a ruler of his own. The first step of Marx's four step theory was feudalism. ...read more.

Middle

When capitalism did start, the Bourgeoisie was holding all the cards in their hand. Most people would live in towns by now and after their revolt, they got into power and where the rulers. The proletariat, or the lower class was still the ones being oppressed. Now that the bourgeoisie are in power, elections to a parliament have been set up. The bourgeoisie where thus rulers and all industry was in their hands. They also took over all trades, and soon became wealthy. The industry grew a lot because the bourgeoisie thought that agriculture was not as important as their industrial plans. This made the peasants even poorer, since more money was given to industry workers, and less was given to the proletariat peasants. As the stage before, this one was also to come to an end. Socialism was the next stage to arise. Now that the Socialist revolution has taken place, and the proletariat has overthrown the bourgeoisie, everybody is equal, and there are no ranks or titles. ...read more.

Conclusion

his description of globalization remains as sharp today as it was 150 years ago" write John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge of The Economist, in their book A Future Perfect: The Challenge and Hidden Promise of Globalization. As this quote states, Marx's teachings are not all relevant for us today, but some of them still stay relevant and useable. As we see today, Marxism can still be found in many of our countries today. Some of these countries are China, Cuba and Libya. Which all have corrupt governments. When the USSR was in that state it was also corrupt. Marx's ideas are just guidelines to history now; it would not be possible to achieve his ideas today, since the world is too advanced. His ideas do work though in small communities, such as in Israel, in the kibbutz. In the kibbutz it works because people really work for the good for each other, and since there is a small community everybody gets a lot of what they need. -- Word count: 890 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Political Philosophy section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Political Philosophy essays

  1. Similarities and differences between 21st century religious fundamentalism and 20th century European Fascism

    This intolerance also translates into the belief that religious views can be coercive and religious views ought to have a role in politics thus cementing the power of the religious fundamentalists in their country. This is comparable to the racism and anti-semitism present in European Fascism whereby the proclaimed enemies

  2. If the state is not a voluntary organisation, how can one be under any ...

    Will Kymlicka defines this as the belief that the individual is 'morally prior' to the community. One objection to this is the communitarian argument that the individual is not 'morally prior' to the community instead individuals are a 'product of the community.'4 There are other objectors to Locke's idea that autonomy is the primary value.

  1. How have political sociologist understood globalization? Globalization is perhaps the central concept of ...

    Robertson's view of globalization is often referred to as the 'World Culture Theory' as it gives a particular insight into how participants in the process of globalization become conscious of and give meaning to living in the world as a single place.

  2. How did Lenin add to Marxism up to 1905, and with what consequences?

    Lenin also stated; "The one serious organisational principle for workers in our movement must be the strictest secrecy, strictest choice of members, training of professional revolutionaries." Lenin wanted the party to be professional and didn't want the country to know that there was a revolutionary party being constructed that was to revolt against the current government.

  1. Why Was Marxism A Minority Ideology Amongst The European Working Class?

    When these two merged in 1875, the Social Democratic Party (SPD) was formed, becoming the most powerful socialist party in Europe. The Trade Unions that flourished in this period were a particular strength to the movement in actively promoting the socialist cause at a local level, and were often blamed

  2. Even in the 21st Century There are Grounds for Arguing that Governments are Dominated ...

    The majority of MPS and Congressmen are white men, the majority of whom being well educated with degrees from the top universities. They are also on average much older than the minimum age for the office (only in America where there is a minimum age for positions in Congress).

  1. Socialist uses of workers' inquiry

    Since the inception of Quaderni Rossi we have never really rigorously argued and developed this point beyond its affirmation. The social dichotomy we are confronted with requires a high level of scientific analysis in relation to capital as well as the conflictual and potentially antagonistic determinant factor that is the working class.

  2. Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto.

    From his retreat, he began writing numerous polemical articles against the government and gave public lectures at a working man's institute. He was quickly targeted as a troublemaker by the authorities. Trailed by police, intimidated by hired thugs, his lectures were often closed down and his applications for teaching jobs blocked.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work