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Outline the teachings of Marx and state whether you think Marxism has any relevance in the 21st century.

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Introduction

Shai Manor 09/11/03 History IB HL 11 A Outline the teachings of Marx and state whether you think Marxism has any relevance in the 21st century. 750-1000 words Marx summarized his ideas into four steps, which he believed already occurred, were occurring, or were going to occur in the future. He saw history as a struggle and conflict between the have, and have-nots. The rulers had land, food and goods, while the other lower classes had almost nothing. The haves had exploited the have-nots and so he believed they would revolt against the rulers. The rulers were making the lower classes work hard, and give them almost nothing for their hard work. He believed the lower classes would defeat the ruling ones, and then they would all co-operate for the good of each other. There would not be any governments and specific rulers, every person would be a ruler of his own. The first step of Marx's four step theory was feudalism. ...read more.

Middle

When capitalism did start, the Bourgeoisie was holding all the cards in their hand. Most people would live in towns by now and after their revolt, they got into power and where the rulers. The proletariat, or the lower class was still the ones being oppressed. Now that the bourgeoisie are in power, elections to a parliament have been set up. The bourgeoisie where thus rulers and all industry was in their hands. They also took over all trades, and soon became wealthy. The industry grew a lot because the bourgeoisie thought that agriculture was not as important as their industrial plans. This made the peasants even poorer, since more money was given to industry workers, and less was given to the proletariat peasants. As the stage before, this one was also to come to an end. Socialism was the next stage to arise. Now that the Socialist revolution has taken place, and the proletariat has overthrown the bourgeoisie, everybody is equal, and there are no ranks or titles. ...read more.

Conclusion

his description of globalization remains as sharp today as it was 150 years ago" write John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge of The Economist, in their book A Future Perfect: The Challenge and Hidden Promise of Globalization. As this quote states, Marx's teachings are not all relevant for us today, but some of them still stay relevant and useable. As we see today, Marxism can still be found in many of our countries today. Some of these countries are China, Cuba and Libya. Which all have corrupt governments. When the USSR was in that state it was also corrupt. Marx's ideas are just guidelines to history now; it would not be possible to achieve his ideas today, since the world is too advanced. His ideas do work though in small communities, such as in Israel, in the kibbutz. In the kibbutz it works because people really work for the good for each other, and since there is a small community everybody gets a lot of what they need. -- Word count: 890 ...read more.

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