• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Social impact of ICT.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Unit 19 - Social impact of ICT. Computers have already had a great effect on society and work. How have we evolved? - Room at bank 20 yrs ago - 1 comp now, 100!! What technology has enabled us to have this change - microprocessors? Silicon - a semi conductor - allows impulses to pass through cleanly. Far east - miniaturising!! - Small Industries - food - reduce the need for human labour. 1.e. cow, milk and bucket. When cheese gets in great demand, cant milk cows myself, so get more people. But still cant keeps up! Can't mechanise cow but can the milking! Now need admin dept to manage staff!! - Paper base system to collate all orders. But now big company - need technology. Man who builds machine needs more men to build more machines. Etc. Technology has both positive and negative effect. 1000's of jobs have gone because of computers. The rapid advances in computer and communication technologies have occurred during periods of considerable change in industrialized economies and although many different factors have conspired towards the generally higher levels of unemployment ICT has undoubtedly played a major role in creating new industries and jobs in general, introduction into it systems in organizations may result in: A need for staff retraining; redeployment; deskilling; regrading; redundancy; changes in job satisfaction; new job opportunities; remote/tele working; changes in career prospects. ...read more.

Middle

It also ignored working realities in most of the developing world. But nevertheless for most of the developed countries, this paradigm provided a basis not only for the structuring of industrial relations but also for social protection systems and retirement pension arrangements. The argument now is that, in any case, this paradigm fails to be appropriate for a network economy where value comes from the manipulation of information and knowledge much more than from the production of material goods. In the process of change, a "job" is becoming redefined simply as "work". AT&T"s vice president for human resources James Meadows put it this way, in a quote attributed to him in the New York Times: People need to look at themselves as self-employed, as vendors who come to this company to sell their skills. In AT&T we have to promote the concept of the whole work force being contingent, though most of our contingent workers are inside our walls. "Jobs" are being replaced by "projects" and "fields of work", giving rise to a society that is increasingly "jobless but not workless".1 Many writers have engaged with this subject. Research on the growth of flexible working practices undertaken for the OECD identified a number of developments, including changes in the design of jobs, greater complexity, higher skill ...read more.

Conclusion

We will begin by exploring further the challenges which face the social partners, considering how the services they currently offer could be provided in other ways by other agencies. We will then investigate the state of industrial relations in one particular sector which has encountered radical change in recent years, the telecommunications industry, to see what evidence for a paradigmatic shift can be found there. We will move on to consider in some detail two examples of new work organisation (call centre working and telework) and two areas where "atypical" working has been growing (agency work and self-employment), to ask whether these are or are not being adequately accommodated within organised industrial relations. We will then turn to consider the degree to which the traditional industrial relations negotiating agenda has been extended by ICT. This will take us into a number of areas, including on-line rights for workers, questions of privacy and electronic surveillance and the increased relevance of copyright and intellectual property rights. We shall look at examples of how the social partners, and in particular the trade unions, are themselves making use of ICT opportunities. Finally, at the end of this journey, we shall return to the issue posed at the start of this chapter, hopefully in a better position to offer some conclusions. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Trade Unions section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Trade Unions essays

  1. Employment relationship

    Therefore, an organization struggling to survive will cut its labor force in order to reduce costs, and priorities profit making. Consequently, the essential long-term thinking is displaced by short-term coping, and needs is dealt with in an ad-hoc piecemeal fashion.

  2. 'The impact of legislation introduced between 1980 and 1993 is the principal reason for ...

    The period within which employers can improve their offer to forestall a strike is now more clearly defined' (YEAR). This argument deploys that ballots may resolve industrial action which may otherwise result in a strike. Employers find the alternative of meeting unions' demands more appealing, therefore the threat of action on behalf of unions is sufficient.

  1. ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

    equal proportions of men and women now working in a predominantly service based economy. The compositional factors of de-industrialisation and the increase in female participation have undoubtedly lowered membership density, although they alone cannot account for the statically slumped figures that we are still witnessing today.

  2. Employee Relations and Trade Union Recognition Within The Catering Sector.

    A separate meeting will be arranged for employees who have to work during the quarterly communication meetings. Resulting from the communication meetings the employee will be made aware of the organization's objectives and strategies and how they will personally be affected by these strategies.

  1. This paper explores the history of government, employee and employer associations and their effects ...

    The early forms of union control over the employment relationship can be seen through the development of craft unions. The distinguishing feature of such unions were that they sought to control wage-prices by restricting the supply of qualified labour available to the employer (Keenoy and Kelly, 1998).

  2. Examine the changes that the continuing development of human resource management has brought about ...

    that in turn led to the formation of unions with widely varying functions. (Deery, S.J, pg. 216) Industrial relations tends to have a collective approach in the organisation whereby the need for a trade union is much highlighted. Fox believed that trade unions should be viewed as providing an organised and continuous way of expressing the sectional interests that exists.

  1. Identify and explain the major issues relative to the unionization process and what organizations ...

    A unit is usually described by the type of work done or jobs classification of employees for example, production and maintenance employees or truckdrivers. In some cases, the number of facilities to be included in a bargaining unit is at issue, and the number of locations to be involved may describe a unit.

  2. What is the influence of women social workers in the United States labor movement?

    took place. Beginning in 1994, however, growth appears to have resumed. The transformation of the American labor force that resulted from the largescale entrance of women has been reflected in the trade unions. The female labor force participation rate rose from 37.7 percent in 1960 to 57.9 percent in 1993.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work