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The Benefits of an Uncodified UK Constitution

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Introduction

´╗┐Explain the term entrenched provisions The extract defines entrenched provision as a codified constitution of establishing formal structures, entrenched means that a constitution is difficult to change. An example of this is the USA?s constitution with 27 amendments. Issues such as the right to bear arms are controversial as it is extremely hard to change their entrenched constitution. The UK has an unentrenched constitution which allows an act of parliament to change what the uncodified constitution says. An example of this is the Constitutional Reform Act of 2005 which amended the UK?s constitution directly. Identify and explain two sources of the British constitution The extract says that there are a ?number of sources? to the UK constitution thus making it an uncodified constitution (it is not all written on one single document). ...read more.

Middle

The USA has a codified constitution in which their entire constitution is written in one document. The case for Britain remaining uncodified is strong, do you agree? Britain has an uncodified constitution which means it is not written in one single document, this also makes the constitution flexible and unentrenched. An uncodified constitution is where it is all written in one document (like the USA). An uncodified constitution is flexible which makes it easy to amend. This is how legislation can keep on top of a growing modern society to allow archaic legislation to be removed and new law relating to modern technology to be introduced. Legislation such as the Freedom of Information Act of 2000 was easily introduced as well as giving devolved powers to Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ...read more.

Conclusion

An uncodified constitution allows for stability and known rights. Britain does have a strong case for remaining uncodified as the USA is struggling to amend the right to bear arms which is leading to more problems than it solves. In the UK, we could easily remove that legislation and re-write it or put in new legislation. That is why Britain should remain codified to keep up with new technology and a changing society to allow archaic laws to be removed to stay in tuned to societies changing ethics. In the 21st century, having one set of rules to abide to and not being able to amend or change them is not helpful to a society ? it limits their ability to change and adapt to what is becoming more acceptable or less acceptable. ...read more.

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