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The Jewish State

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In 1896 a Jewish man by the name of Theodor Herzl published a book called the "The Jewish State". This book became highly regarded by the Jews. The historical events that surround this book have greatly contributed to the publication of "The Jewish State". At a young age, Herzl has already experienced some form of anti-Semitism, but it has never been to the extreme level. During his trip to Paris in 1894, Herzl witnesses the unjust trial of Captain Alfred Dreyfus, A Jewish man in the French army who was accused of Spying for the Germans and sent to an island to exile. This was "mainly because of the prevailing anti - Semitic atmosphere." (Bard, 2005). At the same time both in France and other parts of the world, Jews were being confined to living in the Ghettos and were unequally treated. During Herzl time in France "he witnesses mobs shouting death to the Jews." (Bard, 2005). Countries everywhere were starting to refuse service to the Jews and people refused to buy from Jewish merchants, simply because they were Jewish. Although France was the first country to receive a constitution and the declaration of man, this guaranteed the Jews "their equality before the law, granted by statute, has become practically a dead letter. ...read more.


(Dror, 2004). He sought to unite the Jewish people all over Europe as one people, one culture, and one religion. Herzl argued that "salvation for the Jewish people lay not in assimilation, emancipation or immigration, but rather in a radical solution that would separate prosecutor and victim." (Kadary, 2005). As long as Jews continued to blend into the population of other cultures and tried to live among them in their country anti - Semitism will continue to occur. Herzl really tries to pull the Jewish population together by referring to them as one nation, one people. He goes back in history and refers that Jews through the years have suffered so many downfalls and persecutions and that their religion was stomped on for years and yet they still manage to survive all the struggles and sufferings because their culture, religion and national pride lies within their hearts and souls and not within the external world. Herzl plan is to create a Jewish State where all the Jews can live in as one people, free of persecutions and anti-Semitism. His plan is difficult, but possible. He tries to appeal to the Jewish population to join his movement by saying "we have in our day witnessed the process in connection with nations which were not largely members of the middle class, but poorer, less educated and consequently weaker than ourselves." ...read more.


Herzl's the Jewish State reminded people of their own heritage, their own culture, their own religion. He created a sense of unity within the people. The Jews started rediscovering themselves and their roots, something that has long been forgotten. It is that unity, nationalism and patriotism and the idea that in order to get a country of their own they have to stick together as one people that in 1948, the Jewish population received a country of their own, The State of Israel. Theodor Herzl is remembered as being "A Jewish journalist without means who converted a rag into a flag and a degraded multitude into a nation, that rallied, heads erect, around the flag." (Bianco, 1998). Reference Bard, G. M. (2005). Theodor (Binyamin Ze'ev) Herzl. Jewish Virtual Library. Retrieved July 5, 2005, from http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/biography/Herzl. html. Bianco, D. (1998). The History of Israel. Los Angeles, CA: Torah Aura. D'Avigdor, S. (1988). The Jewish State. New York., NY: Dover Publications. Dror, E. R. (2004). Herzl's Radical Vision changed World History. The Hagshama Department - World Zionist Organization. Retrieved July 5, 2005 from http://www.hagshama.org.il/en/resources/view.asp?id=1661. Herzl, T. (1896). The Jewish State (1896). Retrieved July 5, 2005, from Fordham University, Modern History Sourcebook Web site: http://www.fordham.edu/ halsall/mod/modsbook.html. Kadary, N. (2005). Binyamin Ze'ev (Theodore) Herzl and the Zionist Movement. The Jewish Agency for Israel. Retrieved July 5, 2005 from http://www.jafi.org.il/ education/100/act/10zion.html. The Jewish State 1 ...read more.

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