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The Parliamentary Reform and Redistribution Act of 1884 - 1885.

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Introduction

The Parliamentary Reform and Redistribution Act of 1884 - 1885 The two acts of Parliament, the Reform Act of 1884 and the Redistribution Act of 1885, which followed, could be seen as the forefront of the Labour Parties development from the 1800's. The two Acts would radically change and reform the British Political System in years to come by introducing , a dominant party of the peoples needs that would deeply upset the rule of 'traditional conservatism' that had been the basis of the Political System for years prior to Labours development. The 1884 Parliamentary Reform Act The 1884 Parliamentary Reform Bill was in fact spured on by the 1867 Parliamentary Reform Act, under Disrali, which saw the male working class members gain the right to vote in the major towns, yet not in the counties in England. The Liberal Party Leader, a Mr. William Gladstone saw this, along with many members of his party, as unequal and against there policy of individual freedom. However the Conservative Leader , Lord Salisbury opposed this, and due to the dominance of the Conservative Tradition in Parliament viewed it as an attack on the Tories power and strength in the rural constituencies. However in 1884, Gladstone refused to be beaten, it is perhaps at this time it can be said that it was the turning point in the British Political System. William Gladstone introduced a proposal that would give the entire working class male the right to vote all over the country thus highlighting the Liberal heart of Gladstone. ...read more.

Middle

That outline as regards the industrial situation was given me by reading Hyndman's England for All. Later on in the same year I one evening looked in at a committee meeting of the Social Democratic Federation in Westminster Bridge Road. It was in the basement of one of one of those big buildings facing the House of Commons that I found a group of conspirators sitting. There was Hyndman, occupying the chair, and with him round the table, William Morris, John Burns, H. H. Champion, J. L. Joynes, Herbert Burrows, and others. Source -Edward Carpenter joined the Social Democratic Federation in 1883. http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/Psocial.htm This source highlights the views of the members of the Social Democratic Party at the begging of its era. The Social Democratic Party, the Federation amalgamated into the Independent Labour Party February of 1900. The Fabian Society in October 1883 Edith Nesbit and Hubert Bland decided to form a socialist debating group with their Quaker friend Edward Pease. They were also joined by Havelock Ellis and Frank Podmore and in January 1884 they decided to call themselves the Fabian Society. Podmore suggested that the group should be named after the Roman General, Quintus Fabius Maximus, who advocated the weakening the opposition by harassing operations rather than becoming involved in pitched battles. The Fabians believed that capitalism had created an unjust and inefficient society. They agreed that the ultimate aim of the group should be to reconstruct 'society in accordance with the highest moral possibilities'. ...read more.

Conclusion

Later that year the LRC decided to change its name to the Labour Party. Socialists do not propose by a single Act of Parliament, nor by a sudden revolution, to put all men on an equality, and compel them to remain so. Socialism is not a wild dream of a happy land, where the apples will drop off the trees into our open mouths, the fish come out ot the rivers and fry themselves for dinner, and the looms turn out ready-made suits of velvet with gold buttons, without the trouble of coaling the engine. Neither is it a dream of a nation of stained-glass angels, who always love their neighbours better than themselves, and who never need to work unless they wish. Socialism is a scientific scheme of national organization, entirely wise, just, and practical. It is a kind of national cooperation. Its programme consists, essentially, of one demand, that the land, and all other instruments of production and exchange, shall be the common property of the nation, and shall be used and managed by the nation for the nation. Source - Robert Blatchford, Merrie England (1894) From the 20TH Century Mind Conclusion It is possible to say that the almalgamtion of the Socialist movements couple with the collapse of the attempts of the Liberal Party , with the Independent Labour Party saw the final and most important creation of the socialist movement in Britain the Labour Representaion Committee. General Election Total Votes % of total votes MPs Elected 1900 62,698 1.3 2 1906 321,663 4.8 29 1910 (Jan) 505,657 7.0 40 1910 (Dec) 371,802 6.4 42 Source - http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/Plabour.htm ...read more.

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