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To what extent are the Conservatives committed to their traditional principles?

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´╗┐To what extent are the Conservatives committed to their traditional principles? The Conservative party has drastically changed since 1979 ? first with the extreme right Thatcher, then with the more centralised current party under Cameron. Although the current party can be seen as retaining the traditional principles (for example, Euro-scepticism), they have moved away from their origin in other cases, such as in taxes and education. One way the party has retained its original principles is through Euro-scepticism. This is definitely a traditional value ? Thatcher was constantly having tussles with the EU (the most significant of these being the threat to withhold VAT payments). Cameron has been very critical of the EU Parliament in the past, saying it is ?indecisive? and there is a sense of a ?European Dictatorship?. The Conservatives haven?t been entirely clear on their stance of leaving or remaining in the EU, either, and have instead put the issue on hold until they are re-elected. ...read more.


Arguably, however, this policy comes more from the Lib Dems, but could be taken as a sign that Cameron is centralising his party. I think that this point is a hard one to judge, and that the Conservatives have both moved away from and towards their traditional values, so they almost even each other out. The Conservatives have stayed true another of their traditional values increasing the private sector and reducing the services the government controls. This is in line with the tradition of individuals being able to make a profit of the industry. With the current Conservatives, the threat of privatising and minimising the NHS is a very real one – over 35000 NHS staff have been made redundant since 2010, around £12bn of the NHS has been sold to private companies, 576 of Labour’s SureStart centres have been closed and one major hospital has even been sold entirely to a private health firm. ...read more.


This is shown in Cameron?s policies to cap the welfare. The current Conservative party claims that benefits are ?out of control?. They plan to introduce a new scheme that represents a key traditional principle ? universal credits. This will mean that it is more beneficial to get a job than to stay on welfare, paralleling the idea that individuals should go out and work for themselves instead of relying on the state. This is a fundamental traditional principle, so goes far in showing how dedicated to the original values the current Conservatives are. All in all, while the Conservatives have made attempts to distance themselves from their traditional values, they still remain as a core part of how the party operates and how it forms their policies. The changes that have happened could indeed be seen as Cameron attempting to modernise the party and make it appeal the widest range of people as possible, instead of focusing on the traditional principles of the party. ...read more.

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