• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

To what extent does the Conservative party still follow Thatcherite principals?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Thatcherism comprised a mixture of ideas and policies such as free markets, privatisation of industries, low taxation and little state involvement in people's lives. Some may argue that the Conservative party toady under David Cameron has drifted into a different direction from Thatcherite policies, however others say that Thatcher still has a huge influence on the modern Conservative party. One of Thatcher's main policies was the privatisation of national industries and businesses for example British Telecom in 1981. Privatising these industries was thought to encourage competition and force them to offer cheaper and better services. It can be said that modern conservatives also agree with this idea of privatisation. In fact it seems David Cameron is looking to take further steps and take away government power from sectors such as schools and policing and give the public to freedom to control the state at local level. ...read more.

Middle

Furthermore Cameron believes that tax cuts should not cut the quality of public services. It is also fair to say that the Conservatives in both Thatcher's era and now in Cameron's are Euro-sceptic. Thatcher had many disagreements with the EU, for example she succeeded in regaining some of Britain's financial contributions to Europe. (each member of the EU had to pay money into the EU pot, and then this money would be distributed out, with the neediest European countries getting the most. Britain would hardly get anything and Thatcher succeeded in getting some money back). Evidence to suggest that the party today is still anti- Europe is the fact that when Cameron became conservative leader, he took his MEPs out of the European political group EPP-ED and formed a new more Europe sceptic group called ECR. ...read more.

Conclusion

Conversely, David Cameron wants the state to help give people more opportunities and help reduce poverty. The public will also be able to control the state at local level. To conclude, it is clear that Conservatives are still influenced by Thatcherism. The same principles of privatisation, low taxation and euro-scepticism still form a base in conservative party policies today. However the party today is less radical than it was during the Thatcher years. For example Thatcher believed in free deregulated markets and low taxation, on the other hand, today the party believe that after the economic crisis, markets need some regulation and lowering taxes are not always possible. Also the more active role played by the state shows that the conservative party has moved from the right to a more central position in British politics. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level United Kingdom section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

3 Stars - This essay has many strong points. It is well structured and argued and is evaluative and analytical - there is a clear understanding of the main issues demonstrated here.
Although many of the points here are valid in themselves, there is a lack of detail that weakens some of the argument. I also think that there could be an exploration of the idea that Thatcherism is effectively the new consensus in British politics, and that the comparison could have been extended to New Labour too!

Marked by teacher Dan Carter 26/09/2013

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level United Kingdom essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Impact of government policies

    3 star(s)

    In order to tackle equal opportunities problems the government have put in place policies and legislations which have an influence on the way public services operate, for example Sikh male police officers may wear a dark blue police turban with the badge of the forces visibly revealed upon it.

  2. To what extent has the Conservative party retained traditional conservative principles?

    has to some extent continued with Cameron who has on several occasions referred to the EU as the 'European dictatorship' and is often very critical of European parliament and recently vetoed a European treaty which caused fears amongst many members of parliament that it could force a breakaway from Europe all together.

  1. Is Britain an elective dictatorship?

    Referendums have also undermined the sovereignty of parliament. Referendums in the 1970s were first approved by parliament in the first instance via statue law, but the final decision was effectively taken out of its hands. Most of these problems are rooted in the fusion of the legislature and the executive, which has resulted in the dominance of the executive.

  2. To what extent are judges neutral and independent?

    own initiative, and this could affect justice as the government's opinion is not always necessarily correct.

  1. To what extent is Labour still a Socialist Party?

    (thus there is an objection to private property for reasons including: the fact that Earth is mankind's and no individual has the right to claim any part to himself, private property gives rise to inequality and deprives others of its use).

  2. Conservatism is more a state of mind than a political ideology

    Within conservatism it is believed that society is naturally hierarchical and that therefore, social equality is unachievable and undesirable. Power and status are inevitable features of an organic society. Conservatives believe leadership qualities are inbred they can't be acquired. Therefore authority develops naturally.

  1. From what extent does the UK suffer from a participation crisis?

    This took away the limelight of the real politics and the problems that were most important and the readers had very little information on the political stories. The people do not know what is going on so therefore cannot be well informed enough to get involved in the politics that is happening.

  2. Explain how the DUP has changed its policies (26)

    Furthermore, the DUP has changed its policies with regards to religion. It used to comprise mainly of protestant fundamentalists, however, this influence was reduced somewhat under the Robinson leadership in an attempt to reach out to non-Protestants, particularly socially conservative Catholics.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work