• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Using the example of a single selected political leader, explore the potential of the 'psychology of leadership' in explaining how the responses, drives and decisions of leaders are influenced by the experiences of their past.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Using the example of a single selected political leader, explore the potential of the 'psychology of leadership' in explaining how the responses, drives and decisions of leaders are influenced by the experiences of their past. Margaret Thatcher Margaret Thatcher was born Margaret Hilda Roberts in Grantham, Lincolnshire in 1925, the second daughter of a grocer and a dressmaker. Despite this somewhat modest beginning, she would grow up to become the first woman in European history to be elected prime minister, the first British prime minister in the twentieth century to win three consecutive terms, the nation's longest-serving prime minister since 1827 and arguably the most powerful woman on the Earth's surface during her eleven year reign as British Premier. During her time in office, Margaret Thatcher was very much in a minority inside her own party, her agenda was often peculiar to herself, yet she enjoyed remarkable success in pushing through desired legislation, often faced with great opposition. The inspiration for Thatcher's policies and explanations for the way she ran the Conservative party have long been discussed by political scholars with a variety of opinions produced. ...read more.

Middle

Unable to depend on the traditional supporters of the Conservative leadership, Thatcher was forced to use her charisma to gain support and loyalty. She exercised strict party discipline to limit opposition and used her extensive powers as Prime Minister to give herself enormous influence over the policy making process, therefore making up for the opposition she herself faced within her own party. Furthermore Thatcher turned her deemed flaws into powerful assets. She found her gender to be a powerful way of limiting dissention and asserting her domination on the Conservative party. Many of the older Conservative MP's admitted they found the fact that Thatcher was a woman made it far more difficult for them to disagree with her than if she had been a man in the same position, this suited Thatcher's powerful and domineering personality fine and she utilised it to maximum potential. Thatcher's favouring of a policy of merit over class or gender undoubtedly influenced by her own experiences can be seen throughout her massive over haul of the civil service. The civil service had long become renowned as a haven for privately educated, Oxbridge middle class white men. ...read more.

Conclusion

Thatcher saw the idea of choice as the fundamental basis, which underpins the modern Western world, therefore socialism and its lack of choice posed a significant threat to this. Therefore Thatcher, a self confessed "conviction politician" [6] used her life long personal religious beliefs to influence and justify her policy of anti-socialist government. When she became British Prime Minister, Thatcher put her cherished policies of limiting government control such as returning education, health care, and housing to private control into fruition, thus allowing individuals greater independence from the state while at the same time she crushed institutions such as the Trades Unions, which promoted socialist ideas, therefore it is possible to identity the basis for these economic and social policies of the Conservative government in the 1980's as having their roots in Thatcher's religious upbringing. [1] Campbell, John. Margaret Thatcher: a Grocer's Daughter, London: Random House, 2000, 29. [2] Harris, Robin, ed. The Collected Speeches of Margaret Thatcher, New York: HarperCollins, 1997, p310. [3] Harris, Robin, ed. The Collected Speeches of Margaret Thatcher, New York: Harper Collins, 1997, p311. [4] Harris, Robin, ed. The Collected Speeches of Margaret Thatcher, New York: Harper Collins, 1997, p75. [5] Harris, Robin, ed. The Collected Speeches of Margaret Thatcher, New York: Harper Collins, 1997, p311. [6] http://www.fortifyingthefamily.com/Margaret_Thatcher_on_Freedom. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level United Kingdom section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level United Kingdom essays

  1. Government & Politics Revision Notes

    o Devolved Bodies and Elected Local Authorities -The UK has a system of elected local authorities such as the London Assembly & elected devolved bodies in Scotland, Wales & N.Ireland. The devolved bodies, The Scottish Parliament and the Northern Ireland Assembly have primary legislative powers over many areas.

  2. Unit 1 - Example of Evaluations

    and correct this document an feel I organised myself effectively for this task, it was important that I didn't rush my work and that I stuck closely to the standard layout of a business letter. What went badly As I was well organised and allowed myself enough time for this task, I encountered no real problems in creating this document.

  1. Constitution and Politics

    Commons cannot be denied by any part of the devolved governments and apply to all parts of the UK. Main principles of UK Constitution: Sovereignty (highest law making body, no parliament is subject to its successor. Rule of Law (everyone equal, none punished for arbitrary reasons .

  2. Politics task

    A low turnout can distort results. Only 34% of those who could have voted in the "Do you want a Mayor for London?" actually voted. 72% of these voted 'yes', 28% voted 'no'. But 66% of Londoners failed to vote at all.

  1. What is the main reason for the loss of faith and interest in our ...

    Newspapers like those mentioned above do not have the same kinds of rules as an institution like the BBC which has to be impartial with any stories which it covers, and any information which is presented to the nation, and therefore can be totally one sided, giving absolutely anything a

  2. adult education

    There are set textbook which both teachers and students have to follow strictly, even memorise.

  1. The Assassins A man, who is about thirty years old, was sitting at an ...

    the voice lost some of its unemotional quality, "What were you thinking, killing every single person in that pub and screw it up even more buy blowing the place up?" "Look! I couldn't leave any..." "Evidence?" the voice completed his sentence, "By killing everyone there and blowing the place up, you left a bigger evidence and trail to us.

  2. How Red Is Ed Miliband?

    He is not libertarian - strongly supporting CCTV for example. but - unlike the New Labour old guard - he understands that civil liberties matter ,pst at the bottom of the heap.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work