• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What is Socialism? In what ways, if at all, do you consider the ideas associated with this movement to have been related to those of romanticism?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

EUR 1200: European Studies Catherine Wyatt 19453175 Q:What is Socialism? In what ways, if at all, do you consider the ideas associated with this movement to have been related to those of romanticism? Due 4 October Although diverging in opinion on many topics and in many areas, Romanticism was as much an idea as it was a building block for Socialism. Romanticism developed after the French Revolution of 1789, and was influencial to Socialist icon Karl Marx' 'Communist Manifesto'. This was the leading piece of literature for the socialist/communist movement that followed. This was a period of social unrest where people and communities looked into the feasibility of socialist ideologies. A system of social organization which advocated the vesting of the ownership and control of the means of production, capital, land etcetera, in the community as a whole increased in popularity. Both Romanticism and Socialism depend on the power of Revolutions to bring about the necessary change. The complete rotation created is exactly what is desired to instill the new more 'enlightened' structures. Although Revolution is only the beginning, education of the community members involved is crucial to instill the ideology and sustain it's existence in the society. Furthermore romantic emotions and notions of the era such as cooperation, nationalistic pride, belief in the goodness of humanity, equality, dedication, anti-Materialism are paramount to the emergence and success of Socialism. ...read more.

Middle

Historically where this equality would have meant shared poverty in countries, it was inevitable that a minority would plunder, enslave and exploit the majority. However, through experiences, a key tool to education according to Romanticism theories, workers learn to do without an elite. An infamous example was seen in the Soviet Union, somewhat blamed on the lack of education and knowledge. Many people were peasants or ex-peasants with little knowledge of anything much beyond village life and therefore weren't equipped to take on the tasks of management or other more cerebral forms of mental labour. Socialism's dependence on education and the lack of access to cultural and intellectual resources for workers worked against any kind of progress. A variety of Romantic literature writes of children being closer to nature and the opportunities and positivity of leaving them 'uncivilized'. There is an indirect effect through the impact of other people's neurotic behaviour, particularly that of parents, who have been coerced and changed by their social system. For Socialism to work kids shouldn't be molded by their parents own previous problems or capitalist upbringing that they would then impose on their children. 'The goal-however impossibly paradoxical on the face of it-was to preserve the instinctive freedom, playfulness and sincerity of the natural child into adulthood. ...read more.

Conclusion

Among the characteristic attitudes of Romanticism was a preoccupation with the genius, the hero and the exceptional figure in general, accompanied by a focus on his passions and inner struggles. Emotive poems, strong literature or passionate marching songs of revolution that were written were often for or in honour of a leader. Socialists use symbols to give fervour to this aswell. Posters of their mighty leader breaking the chains, figures with clenched fists, revolutionary songs about the struggle to the death are common during a movement. They often idolize their leader and quote the typical and oft-repeated phrases from the books of these people. Socialists and Romantics alike often take great delight in causing themselves pain and in making people feel sorry for them, whilst they also take pride in being recognized as a 'hero' himself. The shear feasibility of Socialism is far off and romantic in believing that everyone would not be inherently selfish. The foundation of it's ideas rest on Romanticism, those who continue to espouse Socialism can do so only contrary to the warrant of reason, and can defend it only with their eyes closed to the fact that it is obsolete as an ideology. Generally unsuccessful, Socialism has been the cause of millions of deaths through war and starvation and through it's many failures and obvious shortcomings, followers devotedly defend their ideology, making it clear that their devotion to the cause is a Romantic one. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Political Philosophy section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Political Philosophy essays

  1. 'Socialists have disagreed on both the means and ends of socialism' - Discuss

    Therefore the proletariat was not the majority and was not 'class-conscious', and communism was upheld by a communist elite. However, there were significant discrepancies between Soviet Communism and the Marxist model of communism. Firstly, Marx envisioned the collective ownership of the means of production - socialisation.

  2. An analysis of the Marxist perspective on religion

    alienation, then within Communist society there should be no religious belief as the economy and politics are united. This means that there is no need for creation of other cultural forms to fill the gap left by the separation of these two systems.

  1. In what ways has British Socialism differed from other forms of Socialism seen elsewhere? ...

    better wages or working conditions, in some industries these Unions wield a lot of power, e.g the tube drivers. In contrast to this small-scale British Social aspect, in Spain and Yugoslavia it is common for all businesses to be owned co-operatively yet acting under capitalism.

  2. An analysis of the Marxist perspective on religion

    There is no possibility for him to be able to improve himself or pursue his own interests, as he can only do what he is told to, like a machine. This detachment from the fruits of their labour, combined with the inequality, contributes to an increasing alienation, whereby the working

  1. Free essay

    What do you consider to be the defining elements of a socialist outlook?

    a short time be replaced by a dictatorship of the proletariat, and after that a stateless post-capitalist socialist society will emerge. Social democrats on the other hand, just wish to substantially reform or 'humanise' capitalism, often using instruments such as Keynesian economic policy, regulation and progressive taxation.

  2. Socialist uses of workers' inquiry

    But what a number of investigations have been undertaken into crises - agricultural, financial, industrial, commercial, political! The blackguardly features of capitalist exploitation which were exposed by the official investigation organized by the English government and the legislation which was necessitated there as a result of these revelations (legal limitation

  1. An analysis of the Marxist Perspective on Religion

    'Religious distress is at the same time the expression of real distress and the protest against real distress. Religion is the sigh of the oppressed creature, the heart of a heartless world, just as it is the spirit of a spiritless situation. It is the opium of the people.' (1)

  2. 'Accidental Death Of An Anarchist' was written by Dario Fo, in 1970 - Contextualisation

    power position on stage and by manipulating and ridiculing his social superior, creates a great shift in the power dynamics of the scene. This shift shows the audience how ludicrous the class system is, that it is built on ignorance and can be infiltrated by a man who is 'certified' as crazy.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work