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Why is it sometimes difficult to distinguish between pressure groups and political parties (15 marks)

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Introduction

Why is it sometimes difficult to distinguish between pressure groups and political parties? (15 marks) One reason that it may be difficult to distinguish between a pressure group and a political party is because members of both parties and pressure groups can stand in elections. One example of this is when a doctor stood against the closure of his hospital and won the seat for one term and stood as an independent. Also it is made clear that one of the differences between a political party and a pressure group is that a pressure group seeks to influence the decision made by government, whereas a political party seeks to become elected into government. ...read more.

Middle

This was true of the labour party which was formed from trade unions, UKIP are also another example of a pressure group converting into a political party. Therefore it can be seen that although there are clear divisions between pressure groups and political parties the lines are blurring, as pressure groups are putting up candidates for elections and some are converting into political parties. Another reason it may be difficult to distinguish between a pressure group and a political party is that some pressure groups may develop a wide range of policies. ...read more.

Conclusion

Another reason it may be difficult to distinguish between a pressure group and a political party is that some pressure groups work so closely with parties and government that it is difficult to distinguish between their roles. For example the national farmers union worked very closely with the conservatives. Parties must also act in a responsible way, but pressure groups are sometimes known to act in an illegal way or support civil disobedience but many pressure groups especially insider groups work so closely with government that there is no longer a clear distinction between the two. ...read more.

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2 Stars - Pressure groups and political parties are compared in a series of accurate and effectively explained points that demonstrate reasonably secure subject knowledge, but in terms of essay technique the answer is undermined by the lack of an introduction and conclusion and by a reliance on generalised comment over precise examples.

Marked by teacher Dan Carter 10/09/2013

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