• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Why is there increasing disillusionment with party politics in the UK?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Why is there increasing disillusionment with party politics in the UK? The purpose of this short text is to explain why there is increasing disillusionment with party politics in the UK, as well as the factors which cause it. Firstly, the shift, post-Thatcher years, into the common ground of consensual politics by the main parties has worried, and perhaps confused, the average man. After being used to clear divides between the parties for so long, the normal person can no longer comprehend the differences between the major parties. They start to believe that the major parties are all essentially the same beast. Generally, this is true, because the main parties have shifted to the centre and there are only minor economic and social policies which are actually different. Obviously, if the parties agreed on everything, then they would belong to the same organisation, so it cannot be said that the three main parties (Lib-Lab-Con), are absolutely identical, however. ...read more.

Middle

Conflicting opinion would suggest however, that if radical parties are allowed to surface, the stability of the country may be affected. Also, it is possible to suggest, that if these parties were allowed to win a general election, they would threaten the very stability of government (i.e. the system of democracy). As well as political factors, such as the shift towards consensual politics, there are also economic ones. One has to remember, that in 1979, when turnout was high (76%), the economy was just rising out of a slump. People would have been motivated to vote, for the party which they considered, to be best able to manage the country's finances for the next 5 years. During the late 1990s/Early 2000s, the economy was generally good, and inflation was low. Now, because the average man had food in his fridge and a car in the garage, there was not so much motivation to leave the house, and go vote. ...read more.

Conclusion

Will they vote for the parties they fail to identify with, or will they vote for more minor parties, as a sort of protest vote, against the establishment (or perhaps, against the shift towards consensual politics). In conclusion, one could suggest that there is not increasing disillusionment with party politics, within the UK, merely disillusionment with the major parties. It seems that many politically active citizens within the state are shifting their attention to more minor parties, and more radical ones, simply due to the shift to consensual politics; partisan dealignment and uncertain economic conditions. Some are even so fed up of the political game, that they shift their efforts to single issue pressure groups. For example - the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds has more than a million members, as of today, whilst the Conservatives (usually having high numbers of members) having merely 270,000 members (a fall from 1980, of approximately one million). ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Political Philosophy section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Political Philosophy essays

  1. To what extent do recent elections in the UK and the USA support the ...

    The original dealignment thesis was never intended to explain voting patterns in Britain. I also feel, that to cite dealignment is a too convenient approach to voting behaviour. Specifically, I think it ignores the political context of elections, as well as the candidates that are involved.

  2. Iran Country Study

    on the role it would like to play in providing landlocked countries with gas and oil. Iran has from the beginning played down the ideological dimension of this issue. The main aim of Iranian foreign policy has been to prevent the United States and its Turkish and Saudi (on the religious field)

  1. The Disillusionment of Paradise - Jamaica

    Certain colors were forbidden as they represented political connotations. The roads were barricaded with debris, burning cars, and gangsters patrolling the streets with their ak-47. I would sometimes ask myself, why? These men believed they were fighting for a better way life for their families and children.

  2. Russia's Political Party System as an Obstacle to Democratization

    more than seventy years of Communist rule, Soviet society had been rendered remarkably uniform, in the sense that the main political cleavage was between the party nomenklatura (the party elite) and everyone else. With the lack of socioeconomic cleavages, there were few well-defined interests prompting party formation in society.

  1. The Evolving Shape of Elite Politics

    While the government will suppress these actions, they also must take them into account in order to avoid rebellion. "Counterrevolutionary" labels are no longer a feasible ploy to suppress protests. Interregional and intraregional income inequalities (thought to stem in part from the abuse of political power)

  2. Accounts for the changes in voting behaviour in the last 30 years in UK ...

    This had a bearing on electoral geography, namely that the Conservatives dominated the southern part of the country, while Labour was the party of the north and the big cities, areas of economic decline and decay. Another theory was that of sectoral cleavage.

  1. Idealistic Politics

    In the course of my paper I wish to examine the strength and weakness of each of these ideal societies and their implications to political ideology and action. The values of Karl Marx's idealist communist society "may be summed up in the single sentence: Abolition of private property" (Marx, 34).

  2. Power and Politics in Organizations: Public and Private Sector Comparisons

    say, on the desirability of a given policy, normatively driven questions will arise over the mode or method of policy achievement. Because these policies involve things that happen (or do not happen) to human beings, considerations of expediency and efficiency will often take a backseat to normative ideas about goal achievement.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work