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Why the U.S. Constitution is Unique

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Introduction

Julia Gaan Dr. Sell Political Science 120 July 1, 2002 Why the U.S. Constitution is Unique The Constitution is made up of four main elements: Federalism, separation of powers, checks and balances, and The Bill of Rights, these elements make for the strengths of the Constitution that has allowed it to last over 200 years. To sit and read through all of the information and history that this one small document has makes it unique in itself, but I believe the structure and all this one document has governed is what truly makes it unique. ...read more.

Middle

The credence of the Framers' came about after experiencing the concentration of authority during the Revolutionary period, when legislature had the authority. By separating the power and allocated authority, it prevented one section of the government from overpowering another. This balancing of power is the main strength of the Constitution that has allowed it to last over time. Another structure of the Constitution provides each branch of power to check on the other through "checks and balances". As James Madison states in The Federalist, No. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, thankfully, the Framers realized that things do change and had the futuristic reasoning to implement Article V, which empowered the government of the future to make changes that fit with the issues at hand. Overall, the magnitude of a five-parchment document that had the ability to withstand a civil war, go through two World wars, depressions and keep up with the advancement of our culture, is a feat in itself. I believe the Framers of the Constitution would be amazed at how well it has held up and adapted through all of the changes to this country. ...read more.

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